0
Review Article

On the simulation of mitral valve function in health, disease, and treatment

[+] Author and Article Information
Michael Sacks

aWillerson Center for Cardiovascular Modeling and Simulation, Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences and the Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX
msacks@ices.utexas.edu

Andrew Drach

Willerson Center for Cardiovascular Modeling and Simulation, Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences and the Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX
andrew@solwey.com

Chung-Hao Lee

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK
ch.lee@ou.edu

Amir Khalighi

Willerson Center for Cardiovascular Modeling and Simulation, Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences and the Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX
ah.khalighi@gmail.com

Bruno Rego

Willerson Center for Cardiovascular Modeling and Simulation, Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences and the Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX
brego@utexas.edu

Will Zhang

Willerson Center for Cardiovascular Modeling and Simulation, Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences and the Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX
willwz@gmail.com

Salma Ayoub

Willerson Center for Cardiovascular Modeling and Simulation, Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences and the Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX
salmayoub@utexas.edu

Ajit Yoganathan

Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA
Ajit@gmail.com

Robert C Gorman

Gorman Cardiovascular Research Group, Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
robert.gorman@uphs.upenn.edu

Joseph H Gorman, III

Gorman Cardiovascular Research Group, Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
Joseph.Gorman@pennmedicine.upenn.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4043552 History: Received September 11, 2018; Revised March 26, 2019

Abstract

The mitral valve (MV) is the heart valve that regulates blood ?ow between the left atrium and left ventricle (LV). In situations where the MV fails to fully cover the left atrioventricular ori?ce during systole, the resulting regurgitation causes pulmonary congestion, leading to heart failure and/or stroke. The causes of MV insuf?ciency can be either primary (e.g. myxomatous degeneration) where the valvular tissue is organically diseased, or secondary (typically inducded by ischemic cardiomyopathy) termed ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR), is brought on by adverse LV remodeling. IMR is present in up to 40% of patients and more than doubles the probability of cardiovascular morbidity after 3.5 years. There is now agreement that adjunctive procedures are required to treat IMR caused by lea?et tethering. However, there is no consensus regarding the best procedure. Multicenter registries and randomized trials would be necessary to prove which procedure is superior. Given the number of proposed procedures and the complexity and duration of such studies, it is highly unlikely that IMR procedure optimization will be achieved by prospective clinical trials. There is thus an urgent need for cell and tissue physiologically based quantitative assessments of MV function to better design surgical solutions and associated therapies. Novel computational approaches directed towards optimized surgical repair procedures can substantially reduce the need for such trial-and-error approaches. We present the details of our MV modeling techniques, with an emphasis on what is known and investigated at various length scales.

Copyright (c) 2019 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In