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research-article

On the influence of the shoulder kinematic chain on joint kinematics and musculotendon lengths during wheelchair propulsion estimated from multibody kinematics optimization

[+] Author and Article Information
Pierre Puchaud

Institut de Biomécanique Humaine Georges Charpak, Arts et Métiers ParisTech, 151 Boulevard de l’hôpital, 75013 Paris, France; Centre d’Études et de Recherche sur l’Appareillage des Handicapés, Institution Nationale des Invalides, 47 Rue de l'Echat, 94000 Créteil, France
puchaud.pierre@gmail.com

Samuel Hybois

Institut de Biomécanique Humaine Georges Charpak, Arts et Métiers ParisTech, 151 Boulevard de l’hôpital, 75013 Paris, France
samuel.hybois@ensam.eu

Antoine Lombart

Institut de Biomécanique Humaine Georges Charpak, Arts et Métiers ParisTech, 151 Boulevard de l’hôpital, 75013 Paris, France; Centre d’Études et de Recherche sur l’Appareillage des Handicapés, Institution Nationale des Invalides, 47 Rue de l'Echat, 94000 Créteil, France
antoine.lombart@ensam.eu

Joseph Bascou

Institut de Biomécanique Humaine Georges Charpak, Arts et Métiers ParisTech, 151 Boulevard de l’hôpital, 75013 Paris, France; Centre d’Études et de Recherche sur l’Appareillage des Handicapés, Institution Nationale des Invalides, 47 Rue de l'Echat, 94000 Créteil, France
joseph.bascou@invalides.fr

Hélène Pillet

Institut de Biomécanique Humaine Georges Charpak, Arts et Métiers ParisTech, 151 Boulevard de l’hôpital, 75013 Paris, France
helene.pillet@ensam.eu

Pascale Fodé

Centre d’Études et de Recherche sur l’Appareillage des Handicapés, Institution Nationale des Invalides, 47 Rue de l'Echat, 94000 Créteil, France
pascale.fode@invalides.fr

Christophe Sauret

Institut de Biomécanique Humaine Georges Charpak, Arts et Métiers ParisTech, 151 Boulevard de l’hôpital, 75013 Paris, France
christophe.sauret@ensam.eu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4043441 History: Received November 27, 2017; Revised March 29, 2019

Abstract

Multibody kinematic optimization is frequently used to assess shoulder kinematics during manual wheelchair (MWC) propulsion but multiple kinematics chains are available. It is hypothesized that these different kinematic chains affect marker tracking, shoulder kinematics and resulting musculotendon (MT) lengths. In this study, shoulder kinematics and MT lengths obtained from four shoulder kinematic chains (open-loop thorax-clavicle-scapula-humerus (M1), closed-loop with contact ellipsoid (M2), scapula rhythm from regression equations (M3), and a single ball-and- socket joint between the thorax and the humerus (M4) were compared. Right-side shoulder kinematics from seven subjects were obtained with 34 reflective markers and a scapula locator using an optoelectronic motion capture system while propelling on a MWC simulator. Data was processed based on the four models. Results showed the impact of shoulder kinematic chains on all studied variables. Marker reconstruction errors were found similar between M1 and M2 and lower than for M3 and M4. Few degrees of freedom (DoF) were noticeably different between M1 and M2, but all shoulder DoFs were significantly affected between M1 and M4. As a consequence of differences in joint kinematics, MT lengths were affected by the kinematic chain definition. The contact ellipsoid (M2) was found as a good trade-off between marker tracking and penetration avoidance of the scapula. The regression-based model (M3) was less efficient due to limited humerus elevation during MWC propulsion, as well as the ball-and-socket model (M4) which appeared not suitable for upper limbs activities, including MWC propulsion.

Copyright (c) 2019 by ASME
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