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research-article

A Validated, Subject-Specific Finite Element Model for Predictions of Rotator Cuff Tear Propagation

[+] Author and Article Information
R. Matthew Miller

Orthopaedic Robotics Laboratory, Department of Bioengineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh
rmmiller10@gmail.com

James R Thunes

Orthopaedic Robotics Laboratory, Department of Bioengineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh
jrt57@pitt.edu

Volker Musahl

Orthopaedic Robotics Laboratory, Department of Bioengineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh
musahlv@upmc.edu

Spandan Maiti

Orthopaedic Robotics Laboratory, Department of Bioengineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh
Spandan.maiti@gmail.com

Richard E. Debski

Orthopaedic Robotics Laboratory, Department of Bioengineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, 408 Center for Bioengineering, 300 Technology Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15219
genesis1@pitt.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4043872 History: Received May 06, 2018; Revised May 24, 2019

Abstract

Rotator cuff tears are a significant clinical problem previously investigated by unvalidated computational models that either use simplified geometry or isotropic elastic material properties to represent the tendon. The objective of this study was to develop an experimentally validated, finite element model of supraspinatus tendon using specimen-specific geometry and inhomogeneous material properties to predict strains in intact supraspinatus tendon. Three-dimensional tendon surface strains were determined at 60°, 70°, and 90° of glenohumeral abduction for articular and bursal surfaces of supraspinatus tendon during cyclic loading to serve as validation data. A finite element model was developed using the tendon geometry and inhomogeneous material properties to predict surface strains for loading conditions mimicking experimental loading conditions. Experimental strains were directly compared with computational model predictions to validate the model. Overall, the model successfully predicted magnitudes of strains that were within the experimental repeatability of 3% strain of experimental measures on both surfaces of the tendon. Model predictions and experiments showed the largest strains to be located on the articular surface (~8% strain) between the middle and anterior edge of the tendon. Importantly, the reference configuration chosen to calculate strains had a significant effect on strain calculations, and therefore must be defined with an innovative optimization algorithm. This study establishes a rigorously validated, specimen-specific computational model using novel surface strain measurements for use in investigating the function of the supraspinatus tendon and to ultimately predict the propagation of supraspinatus tendon tears based on the tendon's mechanical environment.

Copyright (c) 2019 by ASME
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