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research-article

Effect of local Neck Anatomy on Localized 1D-Measurements of Arterial Stiffness: a FEM Study

[+] Author and Article Information
Adriaan Campo

Ultrasound Elasticity Imaging Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, USA; Laboratory of Biomedical Physics, Antwerp University, Antwerp, Belgium, Campus Groenenborger, Groenenborgerlaan 171 G.U.339, 2020 Antwerpen, België
adriaan.campo@ua.ac.be

Matt McGarry

Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth, USA, 14 Engineering Dr, Hanover, NH, USA, 03755
matthew.d.mcgarry@dartmouth.edu

Thomas Panis

Radiology Department, University Hospital of Brussels, Jette, Belgium, UZ Brussel, Campus Jette, Laarbeeklaan 101, B-1090 Brussels, Belgium
thomas.panis@gmail.com

Joris Dirckx

Laboratory of Biomedical Physics, Antwerp University, Antwerp, Belgium, Campus Groenenborger, Groenenborgerlaan 171 G.U.342, 2020 Antwerpen, België
joris.dirckx@ua.ac.be

Elisa E. Konofagou

Ultrasound Elasticity Imaging Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, USA, Columbia University Medical Campus, 630 West 168th Street, Physicians & Surgeons 19-418, New York, NY, USA 10032
ek2191@columbia.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4042435 History: Received April 09, 2018; Revised December 03, 2018

Abstract

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the most prevalent cause of death in the Western World, and their prevalence is only expected to rise. Several screening modalities aim at detecting CVD at the early stages. A common target for early screening is common carotid artery (CCA) stiffness, as reflected in the pulse wave velocity (PWV). For assessing the CCA stiffness using ultrasound (US), 1D measurements along the CCA axis are typically used, ignoring possible boundary conditions of neck anatomy and the US probe itself. In this study, the effect of stresses and deformations induced by the US probe, and the effect of anatomy surrounding CCA on a simulated 1D stiffness measurement (PWVus) is compared with the ground truth stiffness (PWVgt) in 60 finite-element models (FEM) derived from anatomical CT scans of 10 healthy male volunteers. Based on prior knowledge from the literature, and from results in this study, we conclude that it is safe to approximate arterial stiffness using 1D measurements of compliance or pulse wave velocity, regardless of boundary conditions emerging from the anatomy or from the measurement procedure.

Copyright (c) 2019 by ASME
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