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Technical Brief

The Effect of Textiles Impregnated With Particles With High Emissivity in the Far Infrared, on the Temperature of the Cold Hand

[+] Author and Article Information
Michael Papacharalambous

Orthobiotiki Medical Center,
3-5 Sorou, Marousi,
Athens 15125, Greece
e-mail: mpapa@orthobiotiki.com

Georgia Karvounis

Orthobiotiki Medical Center,
3-5 Sorou, Marousi,
Athens 15125, Greece
e-mail: elpapa@orthobiotiki.com

George Kenanakis

Foundation for Research &
Technology—Hellas (FORTH),
Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL),
N. Plastira 100, Vasilika Vouton,
Heraklion GR-700 13, Crete, Greece
e-mail: gkenanak@iesl.forth.gr

Anshal Gupta

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of California Berkeley,
Berkeley, CA 94720
e-mail: guptaanshal@berkeley.edu

Boris Rubinsky

Fellow ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of California Berkeley,
Berkeley, CA 94720
e-mail: rubinsky@berkeley.edu

Manuscript received September 4, 2018; final manuscript received November 5, 2018; published online January 18, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Ram Devireddy.

J Biomech Eng 141(3), 034502 (Jan 18, 2019) (4 pages) Paper No: BIO-18-1398; doi: 10.1115/1.4042044 History: Received September 04, 2018; Revised November 05, 2018

In engineering and medicine, there is a growing interest in using textiles made of composites with enhanced thermal properties. One such type of textile is fabric impregnated with ceramics and mineral particles. This material has high emissivity in the infrared range and may have therapeutic benefits for treatments of diseases, like Raynaud's syndrome. While there is significant clinical and commercial interest, there is an evident lack of fundamental studies on the heat transfer aspects of these fabrics. The goal of this technical brief is to present results from a fundamental study examining the thermal effects of fabric with ceramics and minerals (produced by Nanobionic, Inc., Athens, Greece) on the temperatures of the hands. With a confidence level of 90%, the results show that the textile with ceramics and minerals has an enhanced thermal effect on warming a cold hand in comparison to a placebo fabric without ceramics or minerals. Much more research is needed to increase the level of confidence and develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanism.

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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

(a) Emission spectrum at T = 37 °C, (b) Emissivity as a function of wavelength (a and b are from Ref. [14], with the authors permission), and (c) typical thermographic image of the two hands prior to the experiments. Note temperature scale bar on the right.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Results from Subject 1 and 2. The figure has marked the columns of photos taken after cold immersion and after 20 min in the pouch. Arrows point to the rows in which the pouches were made of the placebo textile and those mate from the Nanobionic fabric. The top two rows are for the dorsal surface of the hand and the bottom two layers are for the palmar surface.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Results from Subject 3 and 4. The figure has marked the columns of photos taken after cold immersion and after 20 min in the pouch. The configuration is the same like in Fig. 2. The top two rows are for the dorsal surface of the hand and the bottom two layers are for the palmar surface.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Images of hands (dorsal to), palm (bottom) after wearing the textile with the ceramics and the placebo. Note the elevated temperature at the wrist of the hand with the ceramics textile.

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