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research-article

Comparison of Biomechanical Properties and Microstructure of Trabeculae Carneae, Papillary muscles, and Myocardium in Human Heart

[+] Author and Article Information
Fatemeh Fatemifar

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA
f.fatemifar@gmail.com

Marc Feldman

Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, USA
feldmanm@uthscsa.edu

Meagan Oglesby

Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, USA
OglesbyM@uthscsa.edu

Hai-Chao Han

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA
hchan@utsa.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4041966 History: Received May 19, 2018; Revised October 28, 2018

Abstract

Trabeculae carneae account for a significant portion of human ventricular mass, despite being considered embryologic remnants. Recent studies have found trabeculae hypertrophy and fibrosis in hypertrophied left ventricles with various pathological conditions. The objective of this study was to investigate the passive mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of trabeculae carneae and papillary muscles compared to the myocardium in human hearts. Uniaxial tensile tests were performed on samples of trabeculae carneae and myocardium strips, while biaxial tensile tests were performed on samples of papillary muscles and myocardium sheets. The experimental data were fit to a Fung-type strain energy function and material coefficients were determined. The secant moduli at given diastolic stress and strain levels were determined and compared among the tissues. Following the mechanical testing, histology examinations were performed to investigate the microstructural characteristics of the tissues. Our results demonstrated that the trabeculae carneae were significantly stiffer (Secant modulus SM2=80.06±10.04 KPa) and had higher collagen content (16.10±3.80%) than the myocardium (SM2=55.14±20.49 KPa, collagen content=10.06±4.15%) in the left ventricle. The results of the present study improve our understanding of the contribution of trabeculae carneae to left ventricular compliance and will be useful for building accurate computational models of human hearts.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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