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research-article

Multi-Direction Validation of a Finite Element 50th Percentile Male Hybrid III Anthropomorphic Test Device for Spaceflight Applications

[+] Author and Article Information
Derek / A. Jones

Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Virginia-Tech Wake Forest University Center for Injury Biomechanics, 575 N. Patterson Ave, Suite 120, Winston-Salem, NC 27101
derjones@wakehealth.edu

James Gaewsky

Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Virginia-Tech Wake Forest University Center for Injury Biomechanics, 575 N. Patterson Ave, Suite 120, Winston-Salem, NC 27101
jgaewsky@wakehealth.edu

Mona Saffarzadeh

Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Virginia-Tech Wake Forest University Center for Injury Biomechanics, 575 N. Patterson Ave, Suite 120, Winston-Salem, NC 27101
msaffarz@wakehealth.edu

Jacob Putnam

KBRWyle, 2400 NASA Parkway, Houston, TX 77058
jacob.putnam@wyle.com

Ashley Weaver

Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Virginia-Tech Wake Forest University Center for Injury Biomechanics, 575 N. Patterson Ave, Suite 120, Winston-Salem, NC 27101
asweaver@wakehealth.edu

Jeffrey Somers

KBRWyle, 2400 NASA Parkway, Houston, TX 77058
jeffrey.somers@wyle.com

Joel D Stitzel

Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Virginia-Tech Wake Forest University Center for Injury Biomechanics, 575 N. Patterson Ave, Suite 120, Winston-Salem, NC 27101
jstitzel@wakehealth.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4041906 History: Received May 22, 2018; Revised October 12, 2018

Abstract

The use of anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) for calculating injury risk of occupants in spaceflight scenarios is crucial for ensuring the safety of crewmembers. Finite element (FE) modeling of ATDs reduces cost and time in the design process. The objective of this study was to validate a Hybrid III ATD FE model using a multi-direction test matrix for future spaceflight configurations. 25 Hybrid III physical tests were simulated using a 50th percentile male Hybrid III FE model. The sled acceleration pulses were approximately half-sine shaped, and can be described as a combination of peak acceleration and time to reach peak (rise time). The range of peak accelerations was 10-20G, and the rise times were 30-110 ms. Test directions were frontal (-GX), rear (GX), vertical (-GZ), and lateral (-GY). Simulation responses were compared to physical tests using the CORrelation and Analysis (CORA) method. Correlations were very good to excellent and the order of best average response by direction was -GX (0.916±0.020), GZ (0.860±0.116), GX (0.829±0.112), and finally GY (0.804±0.053). Qualitative and quantitative results demonstrated the model was sufficiently validated for spaceflight configuration modeling and simulation.

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