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research-article

Accurate and noise insensitive strain mapping enables ultrasound analysis of cardiac function in three dimensions

[+] Author and Article Information
John Boyle

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, St Louis MO; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Columbia University, New York NY, Black Building 1406, 650 W 168 ST New York, NY 10032
john.boyle.87@gmail.com

Arvin Soepriatna

Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, Room 3025, West Lafayette, IN 47907
asoepria@purdue.edu

Frederick Damen

Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN Full 206, S. Martin Jischke Drive, Room 3025, West Lafayette, IN 47907
fdamen@purdue.edu

Roger Rowe

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University in St. Louis, St Louis MO, Jolley Hall, CB 1185, 1 Brookings Drive St. Louis, MO 63130
rowe.wustl@gmail.com

Robert Pless

Department of Computer Science, George Washington University, Washington DC, 800 22nd St NW Room 4000 Washington, DC 20052
pless@gwu.edu

Attila Kovacs

Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis MO, 660 S. Euclid Ave, CB 8086 St. Louis, MO 63110
akovacs@dom.wustl.edu

Craig Goergen

ASME Member, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, Room 3025, West Lafayette, IN 47907
cgoergen@purdue.edu

Stavros Thomopoulos

ASME Member, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Columbia University, 43 New York NY; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbia University, New York NY, Black Building 1408, 650 W 168 ST New York, NY 10032
sat2@cumc.columbia.edu

Guy M. Genin

ASME Fellow, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, St Louis MO; Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University in St. Louis, St Louis MO, NSF Science and Technology Center for Engineering Mechanobiology, Washington, University in St. Louis, St Louis MO, Jolley Hall, CB 1185, 1 Brookings Drive St. Louis, MO 63130
genin@wustl.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4041576 History: Received April 01, 2018; Revised September 21, 2018

Abstract

Quantifying dynamic strain fields from time-resolved volumetric medical imaging and microscopy stacks is a pressing need for radiology and mechanobiology. A critical limitation of all existing techniques is regularization: because these volumetric images are inherently noisy, current strain mapping techniques must impose either displacement regularization and smoothing that sacrifices spatial resolution, or material property assumptions that presuppose a material model, as in hyperelastic warping. Here, we present, validate, and apply the first three-dimensional (3D) method for estimating mechanical strain directly from raw 3D image stacks without either regularization or assumptions about material behavior. We apply the method to high frequency ultrasound images of mouse hearts to diagnose myocardial infarction. We also apply the method to present the first ever in vivo quantification of elevated strain fields in the heart wall associated with the insertion of the chordae tendinae. The method shows promise for broad application to dynamic medical imaging modalities, including high frequency ultrasound, tagged magnetic resonance imaging, and confocal fluorescence microscopy.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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