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research-article

Bulk Flow and Near Wall Hemodynamics of the Rabbit Aortic Arch: A 4D PC-MRI Derived CFD Study

[+] Author and Article Information
David Molony

Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30322
dmolony@emory.edu

Jaekeun Park

Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology & Emory University, Atlanta, GA, 30332
jcpark2@emory.edu

Lei Zhou

Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30322
lzhou5@emory.edu

Candace Fleischer

Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology & Emory University, Atlanta, GA, 30332; Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30322
candace.fleischer@emory.edu

He-Ying Sun

Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30322
hsun2@emory.edu

Xiaoping Hu

Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Riverside, CA, 92521
xhu@engr.ucr.edu

John Oshinski

Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology & Emory University, Atlanta, GA, 30332; Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30322
jnoshin@emory.edu

Habib Samady

Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30322
Habib.samady@gmail.com

Don P. Giddens

Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology & Emory University, Atlanta, GA, 30332
don.giddens@bme.gatech.edu

Amir Rezvan

Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30322
arezva2@emory.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4041222 History: Received September 27, 2017; Revised July 26, 2018

Abstract

Animal models offer a flexible experimental environment for studying atherosclerosis. The mouse is the most commonly used animal, however, the underlying hemodynamics in larger animals such as the rabbit are far closer to that of humans. The aortic arch is a vessel with complex helical flow and highly heterogeneous shear stress patterns which may influence where atherosclerotic lesions form. A better understanding of intra-species flow variation and the impact of geometry on flow may improve our understanding of where disease forms. In this work we use Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) and 4D Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) to image and measure blood velocity in the rabbit aortic arch. Measured flow rates from the PC-MRI were used as boundary conditions in computational fluid dynamics models of the arches. Helical flow, cross flow index (CFI) and time-averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS) were determined from the simulated flow field. Both traditional geometric metrics and shape modes derived from statistical shape analysis were analyzed with respect to flow helicity. High CFI and low TAWSS were found to co-localize in the ascending aorta and to a lesser extent on the inner curvature of the aortic arch. The Reynolds number was linearly associated with an increase in helical flow intensity (R=0.85, p<.05). Both traditional and statistical shape analysis correlated with increased helical flow symmetry. However, a stronger correlation was obtained from the statistical shape analysis demonstrating its potential for discerning the role of shape in hemodynamic studies.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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