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research-article

A study of the mechanical forces on aphakic iris-fixated intraocular lenses

[+] Author and Article Information
peyman davvalo khongar

Deptartment of Civil, Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Genoa, 16145, Genoa, Italy
peyman.davvalo.khongar@edu.unige.it

Jan O. Pralits

Deptartment of Civil, Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Genoa, 16145, Genoa, Italy
jan.pralits@unige.it

Paolo Soleri

Ophtec BV, Groningen, The Netherlands
p.soleri@ophtec.com

Mario Romano

Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Rozzano - Milano, Italy
mario.romano@hunimed.eu

Rodolfo Repetto

Deptartment of Civil, Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Genoa, 16145, Genoa, Italy
rodolfo.repetto@unige.it

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040588 History: Received February 21, 2018; Revised June 07, 2018

Abstract

Iris-fixated aphakic intraocular lenses (IFIOL) are used in cataract surgery, when more common intraocular lenses cannot be adopted because of the absence of capsular bag support. These lenses can be implanted either on the poste- rior or the anterior surface of the iris. In this work we study whether one of these options is preferable over the other from the mechanical point of view. In particular, we focus on the forces that the IFIOL transmits to the iris, which are asso- ciated with the risk of lens dislocation. We study the prob- lem numerically and consider aqueous flow induced by sac- cadic rotations in the cases of an IFIOL in the anterior and posterior side of the iris. The IFIOL considered is the Arti- san Aphakia +30.0 D lens (IFIOL) produced by Ophtec BV. We perform the simulations in OpenFOAM. We find that the forces transmitted by the aphakic IFIOL to the iris are sig- nificantly higher in the case of posterior implantation. This suggests that lens implantation on the posterior surface of the iris might be associated with a higher risk of lens disloca- tion, when an inadequate amount of iris tissue is enclavated during implantation.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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