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research-article

Anthropomorphic Model of Intrathecal Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics Within the Spinal Subarachnoid Space: Spinal Cord Nerve Roots Increase Steady-Streaming

[+] Author and Article Information
Mohammadreza Khani

Neurophysiological Imaging and Modeling Laboratory, Department of Biological Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844
khan0242@vandals.uidaho.edu

Lucas Sass

Neurophysiological Imaging and Modeling Laboratory, Department of Biological Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844
sass8026@vandals.uidaho.edu

Tao Xing

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844
xing@uidaho.edu

M. Keith Sharp

Biofluid Mechanics Laboratory, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, 40292
keith.sharp@louisville.edu

Olivier Balédent

Bioflow Image, CHU Nord Amiens-Picardie, Amiens, France
olivier.baledent@chu-amiens.fr

Bryn Martin

Neurophysiological Imaging and Modeling Laboratory, Department of Biological Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844
brynm@uidaho.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040401 History: Received February 02, 2018; Revised May 22, 2018

Abstract

Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics are thought to play a vital role in central nervous system (CNS) physiology. The objective of the present study was to investigate the impact of spinal cord nerve roots (NR) on CSF dynamics. A subject-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the complete spinal subarachnoid space (SSS) with and without anatomically realistic NR and non-uniform moving dura wall deformation was constructed. This CFD model allowed detailed investigation of the impact of NR on CSF velocities that is not possible in vivo using MRI or other non-invasive imaging methods. Results showed that NR altered CSF dynamics in terms of velocity field, steady-streaming and vortical structures. Vortices occurred in the cervical spine around NR during CSF flow reversal. The magnitude of steady-streaming CSF flow increased with NR, in particular within the cervical spine. This increase was located axially upstream and downstream of NR due to the interface of adjacent vortices that formed around NR.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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