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In-vivo Quantification of Cardiac-driven Brain Tissue Displacement and Strain Using Displacement-Encoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

[+] Author and Article Information
Soroush Heidari Pahlavian

Conquer Chiari Research Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH USA, 264 Wolf Ledges Pkwy, 1st floor, RM 211b − University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325
sh113@zips.uakron.edu

John Oshinski

Radiology & Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA USA, 1364 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30322
jnoshin@emory.edu

Xiaodong Zhong

Radiology & Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA USA, MR R&D Collaborations, Siemens Healthcare, Atlanta, GA, USA, 1364 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30322
xiaodong.zhong@siemens-healthineers.com

Francis Loth

Conquer Chiari Research Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH USA, 264 Wolf Ledges Pkwy, 1st floor, RM 211b − University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325
loth@uakron.edu

Rouzbeh Amini

Conquer Chiari Research Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH, USA, 264 Wolf Ledges Pkwy, 1st floor, RM 211b − University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325
ramini@uakron.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040227 History: Received December 01, 2017; Revised May 07, 2018

Abstract

Intrinsic cardiac-induced deformation of brain tissue is thought to be important in the pathophysiology of various neurological disorders. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of utilizing displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify two-dimensional neural tissue strain using cardiac-driven brain pulsations. We examined eight adult healthy volunteers with an electrocardiogram-gated spiral DENSE sequence performed at the mid-sagittal plane on a 3 Tesla MRI scanner. Displacement, pixel-wise trajectories, and principal strains were determined in seven regions of interest: the brain stem, cerebellum, corpus callosum, and four cerebral lobes. Quantification of small neural tissue motion and strain along with their spatial and temporal variations in different brain regions was found to be feasible using DENSE. The medial and inferior brain structures (brain stem, cerebellum, and corpus callosum) had significantly larger motion and strain compared to structures located more peripherally. The brain stem had the largest peak mean displacement (187 ± 50 µm, mean ± SD). The largest mean principal strains in compression and extension were observed in the brain stem (0.38 ± 0.08) and the corpus callosum (0.37 ± 0.08), respectively. Up to 0.1% difference was observed in strain measurements due to interscan variabilities. This study showed that DENSE can quantify regional variations in brain tissue motion and strain and has the potential to be utilized as a tool to evaluate the changes in brain tissue dynamics resulting from alterations in biomechanical stresses and tissue properties.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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