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research-article

Statistical characterization of human brain deformation during mild angular acceleration measured in vivo by tagged MRI

[+] Author and Article Information
Deva Chan

Assistant Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York
chand5@rpi.edu

Andrew K. Knutsen

Staff Scientist, Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine, The Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland
andrew.knutsen@nih.gov

Yuan-Chiao Lu

Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine, The Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland
yclu@jhu.edu

Sarah H Yang

Research Assistant, Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine, The Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland
sarah.yang@nih.gov

Elizabeth Magrath

Research Assistant, Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine, The Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland
elizabeth.magrath@gmail.com

Wen-Tung Wang

Human Imaging Scientist, Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine, The Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland
wen-tung.wang@nih.gov

Philip V Bayly

Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University at St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
pvb@wustl.edu

John A. Butman

Staff Clinician, Radiology and Imaging Sciences, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland
jbutmana@cc.nih.gov

Dzung L. Pham

Director, Image Processing Core, Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine, The Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland
dzung.pham@nih.gov

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040230 History: Received September 19, 2017; Revised February 19, 2018

Abstract

Understanding of in vivo brain biomechanical behavior is critical in the study of traumatic brain injury (TBI) mechanisms and prevention. Using tagged magnetic resonance imaging, we measured spatiotemporal brain deformations in 34 healthy human volunteers under mild angular accelerations of the head. Two-dimensional Lagrangian strains were examined throughout the brain in each subject. Strain metrics peaked shortly after contact with a padded stop, corresponding to the inertial response of the brain after head deceleration. Maximum shear strain of at least 3% was experienced at peak deformation by an area fraction (median ± standard error) of 23.5% ± 1.8% of cortical gray matter, 15.9% ± 1.4% of white matter, and 4.0% ± 1.5% of deep gray matter. Cortical gray matter strains were greater in the temporal cortex on the side of the initial contact with the padded stop and also in the contralateral temporal, frontal, and parietal cortex. These tissue-level deformations from a population of healthy volunteers provide the first in vivo measurements of full-volume brain deformation in response to known kinematics. Although strains differed in different tissue type and cortical lobes, no significant differences between male and female head accelerations or strain metrics were found. These cumulative results highlight important kinematic features of the brain's mechanical response and can be used to facilitate the evaluation of computational simulations of TBI.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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