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Pelvic construct prediction of trabecular and cortical structural architecture

[+] Author and Article Information
Dan Tudor Zaharie

The Royal British Legion Centre for Blast Injury Studies at Imperial College London, Imperial College London, London, UKStructural Biomechanics, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, Skempton Building, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK
dan.zaharie10@imperial.ac.uk

Andrew Phillips

The Royal British Legion Centre for Blast Injury Studies at Imperial College London, Imperial College London, London, UKStructural Biomechanics, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, Skempton Building, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK
andrew.phillips@imperial.ac.uk

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4039894 History: Received December 05, 2016; Revised November 10, 2017

Abstract

The pelvic construct is an important part of the body as it facilitates the transfer of upper body weight to the lower limb and protects a number of organs and vessels in the lower abdomen. In addition, the importance of the pelvis is highlighted by the large mortality rates associated with pelvic trauma. Although computational models of the pelvis have been used to assess its structure or behaviour under loading, no attempt has been made to develop a model using a structural mechanics approach as opposed to a continuum mechanics approach. This study presents a mesoscale structural model of the pelvic construct and the joints and ligaments associated with it. Shell elements were used to model cortical bone, while truss elements were used to model trabecular bone and the ligaments and joints. The finite element model was subjected to an iterative optimisation process based on a strain driven bone adaptation algorithm. The bone model was adapted to a number of common daily living activities (walking, stair ascent, stair descent, sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit) by applying onto it both joint and muscle loads derived using a musculoskeletal modelling framework. The cortical thickness distribution and trabecular architecture of the adapted model were compared qualitatively with computed tomography scans and models developed in previous studies showing good agreement. The developed structural model enables a number of applications such as fracture modelling, design and additive manufacturing of frangible surrogates.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME; use license CC-BY 4.0
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