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Review Article

Computational Fluid Dynamics of Vascular Disease in Animal Models

[+] Author and Article Information
Andrea Acuna

Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
aacuna@purdue.edu

Alycia Berman

Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
berman1@purdue.edu

Frederick Damen

Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
fdamen@purdue.edu

Brett Myers

School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, 585 Purdue Mall, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
meyers18@purdue.edu

Amelia Adelsperger

Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
jacks228@purdue.edu

Kelsey Bayer

Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
kbayer@purdue.edu

Melissa Brindise

School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, 585 Purdue Mall, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
mbrindis@purdue.edu

Brittani L Bungart

Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
bbungart@purdue.edu

Alexander M Kiel

Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
amkiel@purdue.edu

Rachel Morrison

Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
morri107@purdue.edu

Joseph Muskat

Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
jmuskat@purdue.edu

Kelsey Wasilczuk

Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
kwasilcz@purdue.edu

Yi Wen

Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Purdue University, 225 South University Street, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
wen16@purdue.edu

Jiacheng Zhang

School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, 585 Purdue Mall, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
zhan1589@purdue.edu

Patrick Zito

Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
pzito@purdue.edu

Craig Goergen

Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
cgoergen@purdue.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4039678 History: Received October 05, 2017; Revised March 03, 2018

Abstract

Recent applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) applied to the cardiovascular system have demonstrated its power in investigating the impact of hemodynamics on disease initiation, progression, and treatment outcomes. Flow metrics such as pressure distributions, wall shear stresses, and blood velocity profiles can be quantified to provide insight into observed pathologies, assist with surgical planning, or even predict disease progression. While numerous studies have performed simulations on clinical human patient data, it often lacks pre-diagnosis information and can be subject to large inter-subject variability, limiting the generalizability of findings. Thus, animal models are often used to identify and manipulate specific factors contributing to vascular disease because they provide a more controlled environment. In this review, we explore the use of CFD in animal models in recent studies to investigate the initiating mechanisms, progression, and intervention effects of various vascular diseases. The first section provides a brief overview of the CFD theory and tools that are commonly used to study blood flow. The following sections are separated by anatomical region, with the abdominal, thoracic, and cerebral areas specifically highlighted. We discuss the associated benefits and obstacles to performing CFD modeling in each location. Lastly, we highlight animal CFD studies focusing on common surgical treatments, including arteriovenous fistulas and pulmonary artery grafts. The studies included in this review demonstrate the value of combining CFD with animal imaging and should encourage further research to optimize and expand upon these techniques for the study of vascular disease.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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