0
research-article

Nonlinear Dynamics of Dacron Aortic Prostheses Conveying Pulsatile Flow

[+] Author and Article Information
Eleonora Tubaldi

Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, Macdonald Engineering Building, 817 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, PQ, Canada, H3A 0C3
eleonora.tubaldi@mail.mcgill.ca

Michael Paidoussis

ASME Fellow, Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, Macdonald Engineering Building, 817 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, PQ, Canada, H3A 0C3
michael.paidoussis@mcgill.ca

Marco Amabili

Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, Macdonald Engineering Building, 817 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, PQ, Canada, H3A 0C3
marco.amabili@mcgill.ca

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4039284 History: Received August 15, 2017; Revised December 31, 2017

Abstract

This study addresses the dynamic response to pulsatile physiological blood flow and pressure of a woven Dacron graft currently used in thoracic aortic surgery. The model of the prosthesis assumes a cylindrical orthotropic shell described by means of nonlinear Novozhilov shell theory. The blood flow is modeled as Newtonian pulsatile flow, and unsteady viscous effects are included. Coupled fluid-structure Lagrange equations for open systems with wave propagation subject to pulsatile flow are applied. Physiological waveforms of blood pressure and velocity are approximated with the first eight harmonics of the corresponding Fourier series. Time responses of the prosthetic wall radial displacement are considered for two physiological conditions: at rest (60 bpm) and at high heart rate (180 bpm). While the response at 60 bpm reproduces the behavior of the pulsatile pressure, higher harmonics frequency contributions are observed at 180 bpm altering the shape of the time response. Frequency-responses show resonance peaks for heart rates between 130 bpm and 200 bpm due to higher harmonics of the pulsatile flow excitation. These resonant peaks correspond to unwanted high-frequency radial oscillations of the vessel wall that can compromise the long term functioning of the prosthesis in case of significant physical activity. Thanks to this study, the dynamic response of Dacron prostheses to pulsatile flow can be understood as well as some possible complications in case of significant physical activity.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In