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Technical Brief

Validation of a Custom Instrumented Retainer Form Factor for Measuring Linear and Angular Head Impact Kinematics

[+] Author and Article Information
Logan Miller

Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, 575 N. Patterson Ave., Suite 120, Winston-Salem, NC 27106; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC
logmille@wakehealth.edu

Calvin Kuo

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, 443 Via Ortega, Room 202, Stanford, CA, 94305
calvink@stanford.edu

Lyndia C. Wu

Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, 443 Via Ortega, Room 202, Stanford, CA, 94305
lyndiacw@stanford.edu

Jillian Urban

Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, 575 N. Patterson Ave., Suite 120, Winston-Salem, NC 27106; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC; Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC
jurban@wakehealth.edu

David Camarillo

Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, 443 Via Ortega, Room 202, Stanford, CA, 94305; Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC
dcamarillo@stanford.edu

Joel D Stitzel

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Wake Forest School of Medicine, 575 N. Patterson Ave., Suite 120, Winston-Salem, NC 27106
jstitzel@wakehealth.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4039165 History: Received September 05, 2017; Revised December 14, 2017

Abstract

Head impact exposure in popular contact sports is not well understood, especially in the youth population, despite recent advances in impact-sensing technology which has allowed widespread collection of real-time head impact data. Head kinematics have been measured in previous studies using instrumented helmets, skin patches, skull caps, and instrumented mouthpieces. A limitation of instrumented helmets is that they cannot be used in contact sports where the athletes do not wear helmets, such as soccer and women's lacrosse. The accuracy of measuring impact kinematics using some of these methods, however, has been recently questioned. Measurement errors have been observed in the skin patch and skull cap sensors due to relative motion between the sensor and the skull. Previous studies indicate that a custom instrumented mouthpiece is a superior method for collecting accurate head acceleration data. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of mounting a sensor device inside an acrylic retainer form factor to measure 6-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) head kinematic response. The current study compares 6DOF mouthpiece kinematics at the head center of gravity (CG) to kinematics measured by an anthropomorphic test device (ATD).

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