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Review Article

Primary and secondary consequences of rotator cuff injury on joint stabilizing tissues in the shoulder

[+] Author and Article Information
Hafizur Rahman

Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801
mrahman3@illinois.edu

Eric Currier

Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801
ecurrier0@gmail.com

Marshall Johnson

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332
mvjohns2@gatech.edu

Rick Goding

Department of Orthopaedic, Joint Preservation Institute of Iowa, West Des Moines, IA 50266
r.goding@jointpreservationiowa.com

Amy J. Wagoner Johnson

Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801
ajwj@illinois.edu

Mariana Kersh

Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801
mkersh@illinois.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4037917 History: Received May 13, 2017; Revised September 13, 2017

Abstract

Rotator cuff tears are one of the primary causes of shoulder pain and dysfunction in the upper extremity accounting over 4.5 million physician visits per year with 250,000 rotator cuff repairs being performed annually in the United States. While the tear is often considered an injury to a specific tendon/tendons and consequently treated as such, there are secondary effects of rotator cuff tears that may have significant consequences for shoulder function. Specifically, rotator cuff tears have been shown to affect the joint cartilage, bone, the ligaments, as well as the remaining intact tendons of the shoulder joint. Injuries associated with the upper extremities account for the largest percent of workplace injuries. Unfortunately, the variable success rate related to rotator cuff tears motivates the need for a better understanding of the biomechanical consequences associated with the shoulder injuries. Understanding the timing of the injury and the secondary anatomic consequences that are likely to have occurred are also of great importance in treatment planning because the approach to the treatment algorithm is influenced by the functional and anatomic state of the rotator cuff and the shoulder complex in general. In this review, we summarized the contribution of rotator cuff tears to joint stability in terms of both primary (injured tendon) and secondary (remaining tissues) consequences including anatomic changes in the tissues surrounding the affected tendon/tendons.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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