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Technical Brief

Reporting the Fatigue Life of 316L Stainless Steel Locking Compression Plate Implants: The Role of the Femoral and Tibial Biomechanics During the Gait

[+] Author and Article Information
Devyn Rice

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,
New Mexico State University,
Las Cruces, NM 88003

Mohamed Shaat

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,
New Mexico State University,
Las Cruces, NM 88003
e-mails: shaat@nmsu.edu;
shaatscience@yahoo.com

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received March 25, 2017; final manuscript received July 29, 2017; published online August 18, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Pasquale Vena.

J Biomech Eng 139(10), 104502 (Aug 18, 2017) (5 pages) Paper No: BIO-17-1127; doi: 10.1115/1.4037561 History: Received March 25, 2017; Revised July 29, 2017

In this study, the fatigue characteristics of femoral and tibial locking compression plate (LCP) implants are determined accounting for the knee biomechanics during the gait. A biomechanical model for the kinematics and kinetics of the knee joint during the complete gait cycle is proposed. The rotations of the femur, tibia, and patella about the knee joint during the gait are determined. Moreover, the patellar-tendon force (PT), quadriceps-tendon force (QT), the tibiofemoral joint force (TFJ), and the patellofemoral joint force (PFJ) through the standard gait cycle are obtained as functions of the body weight (BW). On the basis of the derived biomechanics of the knee joint, the fatigue factors of safety along with the fatigue life of 316L stainless steel femoral and tibial LCP implants are reported as functions of the BW and bone fracture location, for the first time. The reported results reveal that 316L stainless steel LCP implants for femoral surgeries are preferred for conditions in which the bone fracture is close to the knee joint and the BW is less than 80 kg. For tibial surgeries, 316L stainless steel LCP implants can be used for conditions in which the bone fracture is close to the knee joint and the BW is less than 100 kg. This study presents a critical guide for the determination of the fatigue characteristics of LCP implants. The obtained results reveal that the fatigue analyses should be performed on the basis of the body biomechanics to guarantee accurate designs of LCP implants for femoral and tibial orthopedic surgeries.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

The kinematic and kinetic descriptions of a knee joint mechanism

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Fig. 2

(a) Variations of the flexion angle, k, along with the tilt angles of the femoral, tibial, and patellar axes, k¯, γ¯, and ρ¯, during the gait. (b) Variations of α, β, ρ, and π angles during the gait cycle.

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Fig. 3

Variations of the GRF, QT, PT, TFJ, and PFJ forces during the stance phase

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Fig. 4

Experimental validation of the proposed model

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Fig. 5

Fatigue factors of safety of (a) femoral LCP implants and (b) tibial LCP implants as functions of the BW for various bone fracture locations

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Fig. 6

Fatigue life of (a) femoral LCPs and (b) tibial LCPs as functions of the BW for various bone fracture locations

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