0
Technical Brief

Repeatability of a dislocation spinal cord injury model in a rat - a high-speed biomechanical analysis

[+] Author and Article Information
Stephen Mattucci

Orthopaedic and Injury Biomechanics Group, Departments of Orthopaedics and Mechanical Engineering, International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries, University of British Columbia, 818 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada V5Z 1M9
mattucci.stephen.gmail.com

Jie Liu

International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries, University of British Columbia, 818 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada V5Z 1M9
jliu@icord.com

Paul Fijal

Orthopaedic and Injury Biomechanics Group, Departments of Orthopaedics and Mechanical Engineering, International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries, University of British Columbia, 818 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada V5Z 1M9
paul@awakelabs.com

Wolfram Tetzlaff

International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries, University of British Columbia, 818 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada V5Z 1M9
tetzlaff@icord.org

Thomas R Oxland

Professor and Director, Orthopaedic and Injury Biomechanics Group, Departments of Orthopaedics and Mechanical Engineering, International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries, University of British Columbia, 818 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada V5Z 1M9
toxland@icord.org

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4037224 History: Received March 16, 2017; Revised May 30, 2017

Abstract

Dislocation is the most common, and severe, spinal cord injury (SCI) mechanism in humans, yet there are few preclinical models. While dislocation in the rat model has been shown to produce unique outcomes, like other closed column models it exhibits higher outcome variability. Refinement of the dislocation model will enhance the testing of neuroprotective strategies, further biomechanical understanding, and guide therapeutic decisions. The overall objective of this study is to improve biomechanical repeatability of a dislocation SCI model in the rat, through the following specific aims: i) design new injury clamps that pivot and self-align to the vertebrae; ii) measure intervertebral kinematics during injury using the existing and redesigned clamps; and iii) compare relative motion at the vertebrae-clamp interface to determine which clamps provide the most rigid connection. Novel clamps that pivot and self-align were developed based on quantitative rat vertebral anatomy. A dislocation injury was produced in 34 rats at C4/C5 using both the existing and redesigned clamps, and a high-speed x-ray device recorded kinematic motion. Relative motion between the caudal clamp and C5 was significantly greater in the existing clamps compared to the redesigned clamps in dorsoventral translation and rotation. This study demonstrates that relative motions can be of magnitudes that likely affect injury outcomes. We recommend such biomechanical analyses be applied to other SCI models when repeatability is an issue. For this dislocation model, the results show the importance of using clamps that pivot and self-align to the vertebrae.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In