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research-article

Local changes to the distal femoral growth plate following injury in mice

[+] Author and Article Information
Lauren M. Mangano Drenkard

Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 110 Cummington Mall, Boston, MA 02215
lmangano@bu.edu

Meghan E. Kupratis

Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 110 Cummington Mall, Boston, MA 02215
mkup@bu.edu

Katie Li

Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 110 Cummington Mall, Boston, MA 02215
kli430@bu.edu

Louis C. Gerstenfeld

Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MAOrthopaedic Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 72 East Concord St, Boston, MA 02118
lgersten@bu.edu

Elise F. Morgan

Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MAMechanical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MAOrthopaedic Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 110 Cummington Mall, Boston, MA 02215
efmorgan@bu.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4036686 History: Received November 29, 2016; Revised April 30, 2017

Abstract

Injury to the growth plate is associated with growth disturbances, most notably premature cessation of growth. The goal of this study was to identify spatial changes in the structure and composition of the growth plate in response to injury to provide a foundation for developing therapies that minimize the consequences for skeletal development. We used contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography (CECT) and histological analyses of a murine model of growth plate injury to quantify changes in the cartilaginous and osseous tissue of the growth plate. To distinguish between local and global changes, the growth plate was divided into regions of interest near to and far from the injury site. We noted increased thickness and CECT attenuation (a measure correlated with glycosaminoglycan content) near the injury, and increased tissue mineral density of bone bridges within the injury site, compared to outside the injury site and contralateral growth plates. Furthermore, we noted disruption of the normal zonal organization of the physis. The height of the hypertrophic zone was increased at the injury site, and the relative height of the proliferative zone was decreased across the entire injured growth plate. These results indicate that growth plate injury leads to localized disruption of cellular activity and of endochondral ossification. These local changes in tissue structure and composition may contribute to the observed retardation in femur growth. In particular, the changes in proliferative and hypertrophic zone heights seen following injury may impact growth and could be targeted when developing therapies for growth plate injury.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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