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research-article

Design and Validation of a Biosensor Implantation Capsule Robot

[+] Author and Article Information
Wanchuan Xie

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, W342 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0526
xieche23@gmail.com

Weston M. Lewis

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, W342 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0526
westonmlewis@gmail.com

Jared Kaser

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, W342 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0526
jaredkaser@gmail.com

C. Ross Welch

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, W342 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0526
c.ross.welch@gmail.com

Pengbo Li

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, W342 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0526
pengbolee@gmail.com

Carl A. Nelson

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, W342 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0526
cnelson5@unl.edu

Vishal Kothari

Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 4400 Emile Street, Omaha, NE, 68198
vishal.kothari@unmc.edu

Benjamin S. Terry

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, W342 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0526
bterry2@unl.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4036607 History: Received October 31, 2016; Revised April 13, 2017

Abstract

We have proposed a long-term, non-invasive, non-restrictive method of delivering and implanting a biosensor within the body via a swallowable implantation capsule robot (ICR). The design and preliminary validation of the ICR's primary subsystem—the sensor deployment system—is discussed and evidence is provided for major design choices. The purpose of the sensor deployment system is to adhere a small biosensor to the mucosa of the intestine long-term, and the modality was inspired by tapeworms and other organisms that employ a strategy of mechanical adhesion to soft tissue via the combined use of hooks or needles and suckers. Testing was performed to refine the design of the suction and needle attachment as well as the sensor ejection features of the ICR. An experiment was conducted in which needle sharpness, needle length, and vacuum volume were varied, and no statistically significant difference was observed. Finally, preliminary testing, coupled with prior work within a live porcine model, provided evidence that this is a promising approach for implanting a biosensor within the small intestine.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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