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research-article

A Computational Method for Analyzing the Biomechanics of Heart Murmurs

[+] Author and Article Information
Chi Zhu

Graduate Student Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
czhu19@jhu.edu

Jung-Hee Seo

Associate Research Professor Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
jhseo@jhu.edu

Hani Bakhshaee

Postdoctoral Fellow Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
hbakhsh1@jhu.edu

Rajat Mittal

Professor Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
mittal@jhu.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4036262 History: Received January 18, 2017; Revised March 02, 2017

Abstract

A computational framework consisting of a one-way coupled hemodynamic-acoustic method and a wave-decomposition based post-processing approach is developed to investigate the biomechanics of arterial bruits. This framework is then applied to studying the effect of the shear wave on the generation and propagation of bruits from a modeled stenosed artery. The blood flow in the artery is solved by an immersed boundary method (IBM) based incompressible flow solver. The sound generation and propagation in the blood volume is modeled by the linearized perturbed compressible equations, while the sound propagation through the surrounding tissue is modeled by the linear elastic wave equation. A decomposition method is employed to separate the acoustic signal into a compression/longitudinal component (curl free) and a shear/transverse component (divergence free), and the sound signals from cases with and without the shear modulus are monitored on the epidermal surface and are analyzed to reveal the influence of the shear wave. The results show that the compression wave dominates the detected sound signal in the immediate vicinity of the stenosis whereas the shear wave has more influence on surface signals further downstream of the stenosis. The implications of these results on cardiac auscultation are discussed.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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