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Technical Brief

Changes in Joint Contact Mechanics in a Large Quadrupedal Animal Model After Partial Meniscectomy and a Focal Cartilage Injury

[+] Author and Article Information
David J. Heckelsmiller, Douglas R. Pedersen

Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation,
The University of Iowa,
Iowa City, IA 52242-1100;
Department of Biomedical Engineering,
The University of Iowa,
Iowa City, IA 52242-1100

M. James Rudert, Thomas E. Baer, Douglas C. Fredericks

Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation,
The University of Iowa,
Iowa City, IA 52242-1100

Jessica E. Goetz

Orthopedic Biomechanics Lab,
Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation,
The University of Iowa,
2181 Westlawn Building,
Iowa City, IA 52242-1100;
Department of Biomedical Engineering,
The University of Iowa,
Iowa City, IA 52242-1100
e-mail: jessica-goetz@uiowa.edu

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received November 21, 2016; final manuscript received February 27, 2017; published online March 22, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Tammy L. Haut Donahue.

J Biomech Eng 139(5), 054501 (Mar 22, 2017) (5 pages) Paper No: BIO-16-1472; doi: 10.1115/1.4036148 History: Received November 21, 2016; Revised February 27, 2017

Acute mechanical damage and the resulting joint contact abnormalities are central to the initiation and progression of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Study of PTOA is typically performed in vivo with replicate animals using artificially induced injury features. The goal of this work was to measure changes in a joint contact stress in the knee of a large quadruped after creation of a clinically realistic overload injury and a focal cartilage defect. Whole-joint overload was achieved by excising a 5-mm wedge of the anterior medial meniscus. Focal cartilage defects were created using a custom pneumatic impact gun specifically developed and mechanically characterized for this work. To evaluate the effect of these injuries on joint contact mechanics, Tekscan (Tekscan, Inc., South Boston, MA) measurements were obtained pre-operatively, postmeniscectomy, and postimpact (1.2-J) in a nonrandomized group of axially loaded cadaveric sheep knees. Postmeniscectomy, peak contact stress in the medial compartment is increased by 71% (p = 0.03) and contact area is decreased by 35% (p = 0.001); the center of pressure (CoP) shifted toward the cruciate ligaments in both the medial (p = 0.004) and lateral (p = 0.03) compartments. The creation of a cartilage defect did not significantly change any aspect of contact mechanics measured in the meniscectomized knee. This work characterizes the mechanical environment present in a quadrupedal animal knee joint after two methods to reproducibly induce joint injury features that lead to PTOA.

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References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

The cartilage impact gun featuring (a) the impact rod in a loaded position and (b) a conical spike on the impact rod face

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

(a) Photographs of an intact knee specimen (top) and following partial meniscectomy (bottom). The 5-mm wedge of meniscus to be excised has been marked. The Tekscan sensor has been positioned to cover the main weight-bearing portions of the medial and lateral compartments. (b) Tekscan stress maps for an intact knee specimen (top) and the same specimen following partial meniscectomy (bottom).

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

(Top row) Axial view of four 1.2-J cartilage impacts. (Bottom row) Corresponding sagittal views following the bisection of the impact site. Specimens were photographed under equivalent lighting conditions and positioning. India ink has been used to emphasize cartilage damage.

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