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Research Papers

Intracranial Pressure Influences the Behavior of the Optic Nerve Head

[+] Author and Article Information
Yi Hua, Junfei Tong

Department of Mechanical and
Materials Engineering,
University of Nebraska-Lincoln,
Lincoln, NE 68588-0656

Deepta Ghate

Stanley Truhlsen Eye Institute,
University of Nebraska Medical Center,
Omaha, NE 68105-1119;
Center for Advanced Surgical Technology,
University of Nebraska Medical Center,
Omaha, NE 68198-6245

Sachin Kedar

Stanley Truhlsen Eye Institute,
University of Nebraska Medical Center,
Omaha, NE 68105-1119;
Department of Neurological Sciences,
University of Nebraska Medical Center,
Omaha, NE 68198-8440

Linxia Gu

Department of Mechanical and
Materials Engineering,
University of Nebraska-Lincoln,
Lincoln, NE 68588-0656;
Center for Advanced Surgical Technology,
University of Nebraska Medical Center,
Omaha, NE 68198-6245;
Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience,
Lincoln, NE 68588-0656
e-mail: lgu2@unl.edu

1Y. Hua and J. Tong contributed equally to this work.

2Corresponding author.

Manuscript received March 26, 2016; final manuscript received November 20, 2016; published online January 23, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Thao (Vicky) Nguyen.

J Biomech Eng 139(3), 031003 (Jan 23, 2017) (6 pages) Paper No: BIO-16-1119; doi: 10.1115/1.4035406 History: Received March 26, 2016; Revised November 20, 2016

In this work, the biomechanical responses of the optic nerve head (ONH) to acute elevations in intracranial pressure (ICP) were systematically investigated through numerical modeling. An orthogonal experimental design was developed to quantify the influence of ten input factors that govern the anatomy and material properties of the ONH on the peak maximum principal strain (MPS) in the lamina cribrosa (LC) and postlaminar neural tissue (PLNT). Results showed that the sensitivity of ONH responses to various input factors was region-specific. In the LC, the peak MPS was most strongly dependent on the sclera thickness, LC modulus, and scleral canal size, whereas in the PLNT, the peak MPS was more sensitive to the scleral canal size, neural tissue modulus, and pia mater modulus. The enforcement of clinically relevant ICP in the retro-orbital subarachnoid space influenced the sensitivity analysis. It also induced much larger strains in the PLNT than in the LC. Moreover, acute elevation of ICP leads to dramatic strain distribution changes in the PLNT, but had minimal impact on the LC. This work could help to better understand patient-specific responses, to provide guidance on biomechanical factors resulting in optic nerve diseases, such as glaucoma, papilledema, and ischemic optic neuropathy, and to illuminate the possibilities for exploiting their potential to treat and prevent ONH diseases.

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Model geometry. Left: full view of the model with axis of symmetry and equator. Right: Zoom-in view of the optic nerve head region.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Pareto chart of peak maximum principal strain (MPS) in lamina cribrosa (LC) and postlaminar neural tissue (PLNT) to various input factors. A—scleral canal size (mm), B—sclera thickness (mm), C—lamina cribrosa thickness (mm), D—pia mater thickness (mm), E—dura mater thickness (mm), F—sclera modulus (MPa), G—lamina cribrosa modulus (MPa), H—neural tissue modulus (MPa), I—pia mater modulus (MPa), and J—dura mater modulus (MPa).

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Distributions of maximum principal strain in the lamina cribrosa and postlaminar neural tissue to the most sensitive input factors

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Displacement of the pia mater at different intracranial pressures (ICPs)

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