0
Research Papers

The Influence of Normal and Early Vascular Aging on Hemodynamic Characteristics in Cardio- and Cerebrovascular Systems

[+] Author and Article Information
Hongtao Yu

Department of Mechanical and
Materials Engineering,
Wright State University,
Dayton, OH 45435
e-mail: Yu.41@wright.edu

George P. Huang

Fellow ASME
Department of Mechanical and Materials
Engineering,
Wright State University,
Dayton, OH 45435
e-mail: George.huang@wright.edu

Zifeng Yang

Department of Mechanical and
Materials Engineering,
Wright State University,
Dayton, OH 45435
e-mail: Zifeng.yang@wright.edu

Fuyou Liang

School of Naval Architecture,
Ocean and Civil Engineering,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
800 Dongchuan Road,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: Fuyouliang@sjtu.edu.cn

Bryan Ludwig

Boonshoft School of Medicine,
Wright State University,
Dayton, OH 45435;
Department of Neurology—Division of
NeuroInterventional Surgery,
Wright State University/Premier Health-Clinical
Neuroscience Institute,
30 East Apple Street,
Dayton, OH 45409
e-mail: Brludwig@PremierHealth.com

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received January 6, 2016; final manuscript received March 21, 2016; published online April 11, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Tim David.

J Biomech Eng 138(6), 061002 (Apr 11, 2016) (10 pages) Paper No: BIO-16-1008; doi: 10.1115/1.4033179 History: Received January 06, 2016; Revised March 21, 2016

Age-associated alterations in cardiovascular structure and function induce cardiovascular disease in elderly subjects. To investigate the effects of normal vascular aging (NVA) and early vascular aging (EVA) on hemodynamic characteristics in the circle of Willis (CoW), a closed-loop one-dimensional computational model was developed based on fluid mechanics in the vascular system. The numerical simulations revealed that higher central pulse pressure and augmentation index (AIx) appear in the EVA subjects due to early arrival of reflected waves, resulted in the increase of cardiac afterload compared with the NVA subjects. Moreover, the hemodynamic characteristics in the CoW show that the EVA subjects in an older age display a higher blood pressure than that of the NVA with a complete CoW. Herein, the increased blood pressure and flow rate coexist in the subjects with an incomplete CoW. In conclusion, the hemodynamic characteristics in the aortic tree and CoW related to aging appear to play an important role in causing cardiovascular and intravascular disease.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Arterial and venous network consist of 85 arteries and 158 veins: (a) the arterial system, (b) the venous system, and (c) RCL lumped model studied using the electrical analogy

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Simulated hemodynamics for the heart for both the NVA and EVA male 25 yrs, which consists of four cardiac chambers. RA: right atrium, RV: right ventricle, LA: left atrium, and LV: left ventricle. (a) and (b) show the blood pressure in the heart chambers, pulmonary artery, and ascending aorta; (c) and (d) show the volume in the heart chambers.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Comparisons between the simulated data and the measured data of central systolic pressure for both the NVA and EVA

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Comparison between the simulated and the measured data for both the NVA and the EVA: (a) the central pulse pressure and (b) the central AIx

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Mean blood flow in the selected veins: computational results versus literature data

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Arterial pressure propagation along the arterial tree during one cardiac cycle

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Comparison of the total flow rate entering the CoW between the simulated NVA, EVA, and the measured data

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Comparison of the flow rate waveform between the simulated NVA, EVA, and measured waveform in four arterial sites as the large black dot indicates in the arterial tree. (a) the flow rate in the middle cerebral artery, (b) the flow rate in the VA, (c) the flow rate in the ICA, and (d) the flow rate in the CCA.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Comparisons of the pressure and flow rate waveform in a complete CoW. Top two waveforms represent the pressure and flow rate in the ACOM artery; bottom two waveforms represent the pressure and flow rate in the PCOM artery.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Comparisons of the pressure and flow rate waveform in an incomplete CoW. Top two waveforms represent the pressure and flow rate in the ACOM artery with missing RA1; bottom two waveforms represent the pressure and flow rate in the PCOM artery with missing RP1.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In