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Research Papers

The Feasibility of Using Augmented Auditory Feedback From a Pressure Detecting Insole to Reduce the Knee Adduction Moment: A Proof of Concept Study

[+] Author and Article Information
Christopher Ferrigno

Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology,
Rush University Medical Center,
1611 W. Harrison Street,
Suite 111,
Chicago, IL 60612
e-mail: christopher_ferrigno@rush.edu

Ina S. Stoller

Department of Orthopedic Surgery,
Rush University Medical Center,
1611 W. Harrison Street,
Suite 111,
Chicago, IL 60612
e-mail: ina.stoller@gmx.de

Najia Shakoor

Section of Rheumatology,
Rush University Medical Center,
1611 W. Harrison Street,
Suite 510,
Chicago, IL 60612
e-mail: najia_shakoor@rush.edu

Laura E. Thorp

Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology,
Rush University Medical Center,
600 S. Paulina,
Suite 507,
Chicago, IL 60612
e-mail: laura_thorp@rush.edu

Markus A. Wimmer

Department of Orthopedic Surgery,
Rush University Medical Center,
1611 W. Harrison Street,
Suite 205,
Chicago, IL 60612
e-mail: markus_a_wimmer@rush.edu

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received July 6, 2015; final manuscript received November 4, 2015; published online January 27, 2016. Editor: Beth A. Winkelstein.

J Biomech Eng 138(2), 021014 (Jan 27, 2016) (7 pages) Paper No: BIO-15-1332; doi: 10.1115/1.4032123 History: Received July 06, 2015; Revised November 04, 2015

The objective of this work was to conduct a proof of concept study utilizing auditory feedback from a pressure-detecting shoe insole to shift plantar pressure medially in order to reduce the knee adduction moment (KAM). When compared with normal walking, 32 healthy subjects significantly reduced their peak KAM using feedback (p < 0.001). When compared with medial thrust gait, an established gait modification, walking with pressure-based feedback was equally effective at reducing the peak KAM, yet it successfully mitigated other potentially detrimental gait measures such as the peak knee flexion moment (KFM), knee internal rotation moment (KIrM), and a reduction in speed.

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Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Topics: Pressure , Thrust , Feedback , Knee
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Typical subject walking with pressure-based feedback (left) and medial thrust gait (right)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Pressure-based feedback regions

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Fig. 4

The average amount of change, compared with normal walking, when subjects walked with medial thrust gait and pressure-based feedback in the (a) external KAM during early stance (KAM1) and late stance (KAM2), (b) in the other five external knee moments, and (c) the percent change in walking speed, stride length, and cadence

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

The average KAM and KFM waveform for all three walking conditions. The shaded region represents one standard deviation of the normal walking condition only.

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