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Research Papers

Subject-Specific Computational Modeling of Evoked Rabbit Phonation

[+] Author and Article Information
Siyuan Chang

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Vanderbilt University,
2301 Vanderbilt Place,
Nashville, TN 37235-1592
e-mail: siyuan.chang@vanderbilt.edu

Carolyn K. Novaleski

Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences,
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine,
1215 21st Avenue South,
Nashville, TN 37232-4480
e-mail: carolyn.k.novaleski@vanderbilt.edu

Tsuyoshi Kojima

Department of Otolaryngology,
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine,
1215 21st Avenue South,
Nashville, TN 37232-4480

Masanobu Mizuta

Department of Otolaryngology,
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine,
1215 21st Avenue South,
Nashville, TN 37232-4480
e-mail: masanobu.mizuta@vanderbilt.edu

Haoxiang Luo

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Vanderbilt University,
2301 Vanderbilt Place,
Nashville, TN 37235-1592;
Department of Otolaryngology,
Vanderbilt University,
2301 Vanderbilt Place,
Nashville, TN 37235-1592
e-mail: haoxiang.luo@vanderbilt.edu

Bernard Rousseau

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Vanderbilt University,
1215 21st Avenue South,
Nashville, TN 37232-4480;
Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences,
Vanderbilt University,
1215 21st Avenue South,
Nashville, TN 37232-4480;
Department of Otolaryngology,
Vanderbilt University,
1215 21st Avenue South,
Nashville, TN 37232-4480
e-mail: bernard.rousseau@vanderbilt.edu

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received May 26, 2015; final manuscript received November 3, 2015; published online December 8, 2015. Assoc. Editor: David Corr.

J Biomech Eng 138(1), 011005 (Dec 08, 2015) (6 pages) Paper No: BIO-15-1262; doi: 10.1115/1.4032057 History: Received May 26, 2015; Revised November 03, 2015

When developing high-fidelity computational model of vocal fold vibration for voice production of individuals, one would run into typical issues of unknown model parameters and model validation of individual-specific characteristics of phonation. In the current study, the evoked rabbit phonation is adopted to explore some of these issues. In particular, the mechanical properties of the rabbit's vocal fold tissue are unknown for individual subjects. In the model, we couple a 3D vocal fold model that is based on the magnetic resonance (MR) scan of the rabbit larynx and a simple one-dimensional (1D) model for the glottal airflow to perform fast simulations of the vocal fold dynamics. This hybrid three-dimensional (3D)/1D model is then used along with the experimental measurement of each individual subject for determination of the vocal fold properties. The vibration frequency and deformation amplitude from the final model are matched reasonably well for individual subjects. The modeling and validation approaches adopted here could be useful for future development of subject-specific computational models of vocal fold vibration.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Workflow of model reconstruction: (a) segmentation, (b) surface mesh extraction, (c) mesh smoothing, and (d) the finite-element mesh

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Fig. 2

Reconstructed larynx geometry from (a) a posterior view and (b) a superior view, where the vocal fold remains in a closed position

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Fig. 3

(a) An axial slice of the vocal fold from the MR scan, where the cover layer is marked out, and (b) assumption of the profile of the vocal fold cover and body in the model

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Fig. 4

Three-dimensional flow simulation in the stationary domain with an open glottis, where the thick curved line indicates the streamline extracted for later 1D flow model and the thick straight line represents a cross section perpendicular to the streamline

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Fig. 5

A typical vibration cycle in the evoked rabbit phonation via high-speed imaging, where the definition of vocal fold length, L, and the amplitude of opening, d, are shown

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Fig. 6

Comparison between the simulation result and experimental measurement: (a) frequency and (b) amplitude-to-length ratio, dmax/L

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Fig. 7

Waveform of the normalized glottal gap width from the experiment and simulation

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Fig. 8

A typical cycle of vibration obtained from the simulation for sample 1

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