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Research Papers

Numerical Study of Cerebroarterial Hemodynamic Changes Following Carotid Artery Operation: A Comparison Between Multiscale Modeling and Stand-Alone Three-Dimensional Modeling

[+] Author and Article Information
Fuyou Liang

SJTU-CU International Cooperative
Research Center,
School of Naval Architecture,
Ocean and Civil Engineering,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
800 Dongchuan Road,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: fuyouliang@sjtu.edu.cn

Marie Oshima

Institute of Industrial Science,
The University of Tokyo,
Tokyo 153-8505, Japan

Huaxiong Huang

Department of Mathematics and Statistics,
York University,
Toronto, ON M3J 1P3 Canada

Hao Liu

SJTU-CU International Cooperative
Research Center,
School of Naval Architecture,
Ocean and Civil Engineering,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
800 Dongchuan Road,
Shanghai 200240, China;
Graduate School of Engineering,
Chiba University,
Chiba-Shi, Chiba 263-8522, Japan

Shu Takagi

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
The University of Tokyo,
Tokyo 113-8654, Japan

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received May 1, 2015; final manuscript received August 14, 2015; published online September 7, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Tim David.

J Biomech Eng 137(10), 101011 (Sep 07, 2015) (12 pages) Paper No: BIO-15-1211; doi: 10.1115/1.4031457 History: Received May 01, 2015; Revised August 14, 2015

Free outflow boundary conditions have been widely adopted in hemodynamic model studies, they, however, intrinsically lack the ability to account for the regulatory mechanisms of systemic hemodynamics and hence carry a risk of producing incorrect results when applied to vascular segments with multiple outlets. In the present study, we developed a multiscale model capable of incorporating global cardiovascular properties into the simulation of blood flows in local vascular segments. The multiscale model was constructed by coupling a three-dimensional (3D) model of local arterial segments with a zero-one-dimensional (0-1-D) model of the cardiovascular system. Numerical validation based on an idealized model demonstrated the ability of the multiscale model to preserve reasonable pressure/flow wave transmission among different models. The multiscale model was further calibrated with clinical data to simulate cerebroarterial hemodynamics in a patient undergoing carotid artery operation. The results showed pronounced hemodynamic changes in the cerebral circulation following the operation. Additional numerical experiments revealed that a stand-alone 3D model with free outflow conditions failed to reproduce the results obtained by the multiscale model. These results demonstrated the potential advantage of multiscale modeling over single-scale modeling in patient-specific hemodynamic studies. Due to the fact that the present study was limited to a single patient, studies on more patients would be required to further confirm the findings.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 2

Illustration of the coupling between the 1D model and the 3D model through a 0D interface model

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Fig. 1

Schematic description of the multiscale modeling system, where a 3D model of the MCA bifurcation is embedded in a 0-1-D multiscale model of the entire cardiovascular system

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Fig. 3

Flowchart of coupling computation (see Appendix A for a detailed description of the exchanges of hemodynamic quantities among models)

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Fig. 4

Results computed by a multiscale model of a 3D MCA bifurcation coupled with the cardiovascular system and comparisons with the results obtained by the original 0-1-D model before the 3D model is embedded: (a) flow velocity contour in the center plane of the MCA bifurcation, (b) history of convergence error of coupling computation, and (c/d) comparisons of computed flow/pressure waveforms at the boundaries of the MCA bifurcation between the multiscale model and the 0-1-D model

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Fig. 7

Comparisons of computed flow waveforms at the ACA and MCA outlets between the multiscale model and the stand-alone 3D model. The results of multiscale computation and stand-alone 3D computation are represented by solid lines and dashed dotted lines, respectively. The preoperative and postoperative results are shown on the upper and lower panels, respectively. Note that the same inflow conditions (flow waveform imposed at the ICA inlet) have been prescribed for the multiscale model and the stand-alone 3D model.

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Fig. 8

Velocity vectors in a plane cutting through the MCA bifurcation visualized based on the multiscale computation (upper panel) and stand-alone 3D computation (lower panel). The preoperative and postoperative results are shown on the left and right sides, respectively. The arrow lines indicate the directions of blood flows in the near bifurcation region.

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Fig. 5

Flow (upper panel, left) and pressure (upper panel, right) waveforms at the boundaries of the MCA bifurcation computed by the multiscale model (the thick solid lines represent the preoperative results, whereas the thin dashed lines denote the postoperative results) and the DSA images taken before (lower panel, left) and after (lower panel, right) the operation. The DSA images show that the direction of flow in the left ACA changed after the operation.

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Fig. 6

Spatial distributions of TAWSS and OSI on the walls of the MCA bifurcation obtained from multiscale computations (upper panel) and stand-alone 3D computations (lower panel). The preoperative and postoperative results are shown on the left and right sides, respectively.

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