0
Technical Brief

Biomechanical Analysis of a Dynamic Stability Test System to Evoke Sway and Step Recovery

[+] Author and Article Information
Anne Gildenhuys

Dynastream Innovations, Inc.,
A Subsidiary of Garmin Ltd.,
Cochrane, AB T4C 0S4, Canada
e-mail: Anne.Gildenhuys@dynastream.com

Payam Zandiyeh

Department of Mechanical and
Manufacturing Engineering,
University of Calgary,
Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
e-mail: p.zandiyeh@gmail.com

Gregor Kuntze

Department of Mechanical and
Manufacturing Engineering,
University of Calgary,
Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
e-mail: gkuntze@ucalgary.ca

Peter Goldsmith

Associate Professor
Department of Mechanical and
Manufacturing Engineering,
University of Calgary,
Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
e-mail: peter.goldsmith@ucalgary.ca

Janet L. Ronsky

Professor
Department of Mechanical and
Manufacturing Engineering,
University of Calgary,
Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
e-mail: jlronsky@ucalgary.ca

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received June 30, 2014; final manuscript received July 30, 2015; published online August 31, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Paul Rullkoetter.

J Biomech Eng 137(10), 104501 (Aug 31, 2015) (7 pages) Paper No: BIO-14-1305; doi: 10.1115/1.4031329 History: Received June 30, 2014; Revised July 30, 2015; Accepted August 14, 2015

This paper reports on the dynamic analysis and experimental validation of a method to perturb the balance of subjects in quiet standing. Electronically released weights pull the subject's waist through a specified displacement sensed by a photoelectric sensor. A dynamic model is derived that computes the force applied to the subject as a function of waist acceleration. This model accurately predicts the acceleration of mock subjects (suspended masses) with high repeatability. The validity and simplicity of this model suggest that this method can provide a standard for provocation testing on stable surfaces. Proof-of-concept trials on human subjects demonstrate that the device can be used with a force platform and motion tracking and that the device can induce both sway and step recoveries in healthy male adults.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2015 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

DSTS assembly. (A) Shaft, (B) telescopic post, (C) weights, (D) subject cord, (E) subject spool, (F) weight spool, (G) side brake, (H) clutch, (I) photoelectric sensor, (J) photoelectric reflector, (K) base, (L) bottom support, (M) brace, (N) inner post, (O) outer post, (P) height adjustment pin, (Q) top strap, (R) set screws, (S) bearing, (T) manual release handle for side brake, (U) machined end of shaft for wrench or handles, (V) pretensioning weight, and (W) electrical box.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Electrical schematic of the control system

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Example trial for model validation

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Mean CoP excursion versus time for forward sway with varying perturbation displacement (No. of trials)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Mean CoP excursion versus time for backward sway with varying perturbation displacement (No. of trials)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Mean CoM excursion versus time for forward sway with varying perturbation displacement (No. of trials)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Mean CoM excursion versus time for backward sway with varying perturbation displacement (No. of trials)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In