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Research Papers

Evaluating the Effect of Sinex® (0.05% Oxymetazoline) Nasal Spray on Reduction of Nasal Congestion Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

[+] Author and Article Information
Aravind Kishore

UC Simulation Center,
Department of Mechanical and
Materials Engineering,
University of Cincinnati,
PO Box 210072,
Cincinnati, OH 45221
e-mail: kishora@email.uc.edu

Lauren Blake

UC Simulation Center,
Department of Mechanical and
Materials Engineering,
University of Cincinnati,
PO Box 210072,
Cincinnati, OH 45221
e-mail: blakeln@mail.uc.edu

Chengming Wang

Procter & Gamble Company (P&G),
8700 Mason-Montgomery Road,
Mason, OH 45040
e-mail: wang.c.4@pg.com

Shan Ba

Procter & Gamble Company (P&G),
8700 Mason-Montgomery Road,
Mason, OH 45040
e-mail: ba.s@pg.com

Gary Gross

Procter & Gamble Company (P&G),
8611 Beckett Road,
E142,
West Chester, OH 45069
e-mail: gross.gj@pg.com

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received November 12, 2014; final manuscript received March 6, 2015; published online June 23, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Naomi Chesler.

J Biomech Eng 137(8), 081011 (Aug 01, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: BIO-14-1625; doi: 10.1115/1.4030825 History: Received November 12, 2014; Revised March 06, 2015; Online June 23, 2015

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to simulate air flow changes in reconstructed nasal passages based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data from a previous clinical study of 0.05% Oxymetazoline (Vicks Sinex Micromist®). Total-pressure boundary conditions were uniquely applied to accommodate low patency subjects. Net nasal resistance, the primary simulation outcome, was determined using a parallel-circuit analogy and compared across treatments. Relative risk (RR) calculations show that for a 50% reduction in nasal resistance, subjects treated with Sinex® are 9.1 times more likely to achieve this after 8 hr, and 3.2 times more likely after 12 hr compared to Sham.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Nasal passages (darker gray region) reconstructed from MRI slices using Simpleware. Face included for illustrative purposes only.

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Fig. 2

Calculation of nasal resistance; steeper slopes indicate higher nasal resistance

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Fig. 3

3D CAD models reconstructed from MRI slices of subject NN (Sinex®) at the three time points qualitatively show an increase in flow volume after treatment

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Fig. 4

Flow path lines in nasal passages of subject NN (Sinex®) at three time points: (a) predose, (b) 8 hr post-treatment, and (c) 12 hr post-treatment. Dashed box showing location of nasal valve in predose image.

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Fig. 5

Nasal passage anatomy (coronal view) SM: superior meatus; MM: medial meatus; IM: inferior meatus

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Fig. 6

Scatter plots for percentage reduction of nasal resistance: (a) after 8 hr; (b) after 12 hr

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Fig. 7

Chart of Relative Risk (RR) reductions of 50% or more at both time points

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