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Research Papers

The Contribution of the Acetabular Labrum to Hip Joint Stability: A Quantitative Analysis Using a Dynamic Three-Dimensional Robot Model

[+] Author and Article Information
Tara F. Bonner

Cleveland Clinic Foundation,
9500 Euclid Avenue, ND20,
Cleveland, OH 44195
e-mail: bonnert2@ccf.org

Robb W. Colbrunn

Cleveland Clinic Foundation,
9500 Euclid Avenue, ND20,
Cleveland, OH 44195
e-mail: colbrur@ccf.org

John J. Bottros

Cleveland Clinic Foundation,
9500 Euclid Avenue, Desk A41,
Cleveland, OH 44195
e-mail: johnbottros@gmail.com

Amar B. Mutnal

Cleveland Clinic Foundation,
9500 Euclid Avenue, Desk A41,
Cleveland, OH 44195
e-mail: amutnal@gmail.com

Clay B. Greeson

Cleveland Clinic Foundation,
9500 Euclid Avenue, Desk A41,
Cleveland, OH 44195
e-mail: clayg5@gmail.com

Alison K. Klika

Cleveland Clinic Foundation,
9500 Euclid Avenue, Desk A41,
Cleveland, OH 44195
e-mail: klikaa@ccf.org

Antonie J. van den Bogert

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Cleveland State University,
2121 Euclid Avenue,
Cleveland, OH 44115
e-mail: a.vandenbogert@csuohio.edu

Wael K. Barsoum

Cleveland Clinic Foundation,
9500 Euclid Avenue, Desk A41,
Cleveland, OH 44195
e-mail: barsouw@ccf.org

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received September 15, 2014; final manuscript received February 27, 2015; published online April 23, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Kenneth Fischer.

J Biomech Eng 137(6), 061012 (Jun 01, 2015) (5 pages) Paper No: BIO-14-1461; doi: 10.1115/1.4030012 History: Received September 15, 2014; Revised February 27, 2015; Online April 23, 2015

The acetabular labrum provides mechanical stability to the hip joint in extreme positions where the femoral head is disposed to subluxation. We aimed to quantify the isolated labrum's stabilizing value. Five human cadaveric hips were mounted to a robotic manipulator, and subluxation potential tests were run with and without labrum. Three-dimensional (3D) kinematic data were quantified using the stability index (Colbrunn et al., 2013, “Impingement and Stability of Total Hip Arthroplasty Versus Femoral Head Resurfacing Using a Cadaveric Robotics Model,” J. Orthop. Res., 31(7), pp. 1108–1115). Global and regional stability indices were significantly greater with labrum intact than after total labrectomy for both anterior and posterior provocative positions. In extreme positions, the labrum imparts significant overall mechanical resistance to hip subluxation. Regional stability contributions vary with joint orientation.

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Copyright © 2015 by ASME
Topics: Stability , Robots
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Radial plot of stability index values comparing stability between native and labrum-deficient conditions in the anterior provocative position. The figure represents the cup shaped stability envelope laid flat with anatomical directions analogous to an observer standing to the right of the subject and viewing the right hip. Regional stability index values are shaded.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Radial plot of stability index values comparing stability between native and labrum-deficient conditions in the posterior provocative position. The figure represents the cup shaped stability envelope laid flat with anatomical directions analogous to an observer standing to the right of the subject and viewing the right hip. Regional stability index values are shaded.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Defining point of subluxation potential. (a) Lateral joint displacement versus vector angle. (b) Change in lateral joint displacement versus force vector angle. Note the inflection point in the curve at the subluxation potential angle, θd, and that this occurs at the force vector angle where the change in lateral displacement exceeds 0.05 mm/deg.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Subluxation potential test with a rotating, constant magnitude force vector. Distance refers to the lateral displacement.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

The hemi-pelvis mounted on the 6 degree-of-freedom musculoskeletal simulator [19]. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 31:1108–1115, 2013.

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