0
Research Papers

Mechanical Platelet Activation Potential in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

[+] Author and Article Information
Kirk B. Hansen, Amirhossein Arzani

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of California,
5126 Etcheverry Hall,
Berkeley, CA 94720-1740

Shawn C. Shadden

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of California,
5126 Etcheverry Hall,
Berkeley, CA 94720-1740
e-mail: shadden@berkeley.edu

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received July 31, 2014; final manuscript received January 8, 2015; published online February 5, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Alison Marsden.

J Biomech Eng 137(4), 041005 (Apr 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: BIO-14-1355; doi: 10.1115/1.4029580 History: Received July 31, 2014; Revised January 08, 2015; Online February 05, 2015

Intraluminal thrombus (ILT) in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) has potential implications to aneurysm growth and rupture risk; yet, the mechanisms underlying its development remain poorly understood. Some researchers have proposed that ILT development may be driven by biomechanical platelet activation within the AAA, followed by adhesion in regions of low wall shear stress. Studies have investigated wall shear stress levels within AAA, but platelet activation potential (AP) has not been quantified. In this study, patient-specific computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models were used to analyze stress-induced AP within AAA under rest and exercise flow conditions. The analysis was conducted using Lagrangian particle-based and Eulerian continuum-based approaches, and the results were compared. Results indicated that biomechanical platelet activation is unlikely to play a significant role for the conditions considered. No consistent trend was observed in comparing rest and exercise conditions, but the functional dependence of AP on stress magnitude and exposure time can have a large impact on absolute levels of anticipated platelet AP. The Lagrangian method obtained higher peak AP values, although this difference was limited to a small percentage of particles that falls below reported levels of physiologic background platelet activation.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2015 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Image-based computer models of the abdominal aorta and surrounding vasculature, with aneurysmal region of interest Ω highlighted in shade

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

PDF for time-averaged platelet AP. All results are based on linear stress-exposure time model except where noted, and in cgs units.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

CCDF for time-averaged platelet AP. All results are based on linear stress-exposure time model except where noted, and in cgs units.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Volume rendering of time-averaged AP (dyn s cm-2) for patient 1, based on linear stress-exposure time model

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Volume rendering of time-averaged AP (dyn s cm-2) for patient 2, based on linear stress-exposure time model

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Volume rendering of time-averaged AP (dyn s cm-2) for patient 3, based on linear stress-exposure time model

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Volume rendering of time-averaged AP (dyn s cm-2) for patient 4, based on linear stress-exposure time model

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Volume rendering of time-averaged AP (dyn s cm-2) for patient 5, based on linear stress-exposure time model

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Volume rendering of time-averaged power law AP (cgs units) for patient 1

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In