0
Research Papers

Effects of Different Loading Patterns on the Trabecular Bone Morphology of the Proximal Femur Using Adaptive Bone Remodeling

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Mohammad Ali Banijamali, Ashkan Vaziri

Department of Mechanical
and Industrial Engineering,
Northeastern University,
Boston, MA 02115

Ramin Oftadeh

Department of Mechanical
and Industrial Engineering,
Northeastern University,
Boston, MA 02115
Center for Advanced Orthopaedic Studies,
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center,
Harvard Medical School,
Boston, MA 02215

Ara Nazarian

Center for Advanced Orthopaedic Studies,
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center,
Harvard Medical School,
Boston, MA 02215

Ruben Goebel

Sport Science Program,
Qatar University,
Doha 2713, Qatar

Hamid Nayeb-Hashemi

Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Department of Mechanical
and Industrial Engineering,
Northeastern University,
334 Snell Engineering Center,
360 Huntington Avenue,
Boston, MA 02115
e-mail: hamid@coe.neu.edu

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received August 8, 2014; final manuscript received November 7, 2014; accepted manuscript posted November 13, 2014; published online December 10, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Blaine Christiansen.

J Biomech Eng 137(1), 011011 (Jan 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: BIO-14-1377; doi: 10.1115/1.4029059 History: Received August 08, 2014; Revised November 07, 2014; Accepted November 13, 2014; Online December 10, 2014

In this study, the changes in the bone density of human femur model as a result of different loadings were investigated. The model initially consisted of a solid shell representing cortical bone encompassing a cubical network of interconnected rods representing trabecular bone. A computationally efficient program was developed that iteratively changed the structure of trabecular bone by keeping the local stress in the structure within a defined stress range. The stress was controlled by either enhancing existing beam elements or removing beams from the initial trabecular frame structure. Analyses were performed for two cases of homogenous isotropic and transversely isotropic beams. Trabecular bone structure was obtained for three load cases: walking, stair climbing and stumbling without falling. The results indicate that trabecular bone tissue material properties do not have a significant effect on the converged structure of trabecular bone. In addition, as the magnitude of the loads increase, the internal structure becomes denser in critical zones. Loading associated with the stumbling results in the highest density; whereas walking, considered as a routine daily activity, results in the least internal density in different regions. Furthermore, bone volume fraction at the critical regions of the converged structure is in good agreement with previously measured data obtained from combinations of dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and computed tomography (CT). The results indicate that the converged bone architecture consisting of rods and plates are consistent with the natural bone morphology of the femur. The proposed model shows a promising means to understand the effects of different individual loading patterns on the bone density.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2015 by ASME
Topics: Stress , Bone , Stairs , Density , Rods
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Initial model of proximal femoral head before the start of the remodeling process: (a) Cortical bone and (b) trabecular bone structure

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

3D model of femur with muscle attachment sites and the direction of forces and coordinate system. (1) Hip contact, (2) abductor, (3) tensor fascia latae, proximal part, (4) tensor fascia latae, distal part, (5) ilio-tibial tract, proximal part, and (6) ilio-tibial tract, distal part. The magnitudes of forces for the three cases of loadings are shown in Table 1.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Schematic flow chart of the remodeling process

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Maximum principal stress contour in trabecular bone before adaptation process: (a) walking, (b) stair climbing, and (c) stumbling

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Side views of converged trabecular structure for the stress range criteria of [1.5, 10] MPa (a) modeling material as transversely isotropic and (b) modeling material as isotropic. On the case of walking with transversely isotropic material, curved overlays indicate patterns of trabecular bone created in the direction of principal and secondary loading groups and the triangle at the femoral neck shows the Ward’s triangle.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

3D view of trabecular plates—bone subjected to (a) walking, (b) stair climbing, and (c) stumbling. For all the cases the transversely isotropic material has been used.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Final architecture of trabecular bone showing the effect of various stress ranges on converged model for walking and stair climbing load cases. With (a) lower bound variations and (b) upper bound variations.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Head, neck, and trochanter regions used to obtain bone volume fractions (BV/TV)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In