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Review Article

Rotational Acceleration, Brain Tissue Strain, and the Relationship to Concussion

[+] Author and Article Information
Andrew Post

School of Human Kinetics,
Faculty of Health Science,
University of Ottawa,
200 Lees,
Room A106,
Ottawa, ON K1S 5S9, Canada
e-mail: apost@uottawa.ca

T. Blaine Hoshizaki

School of Human Kinetics,
Faculty of Health Science,
University of Ottawa,
200 Lees, Room A106,
Ottawa, ON K1S 5S9, Canada

Manuscript received March 19, 2014; final manuscript received October 29, 2014; published online January 29, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Barclay Morrison.

J Biomech Eng 137(3), 030801 (Mar 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: BIO-14-1122; doi: 10.1115/1.4028983 History: Received March 19, 2014; Revised October 29, 2014; Online January 29, 2015

The mechanisms of concussion have been investigated by many researchers using a variety of methods. However, there remains much debate over the relationships between head kinematics from an impact and concussion. This review presents the links between research conducted in different disciplines to better understand the relationship between linear and rotational acceleration and brain strains that have been postulated as the root cause of concussion. These concepts are important when assigning performance variables for helmet development, car design, and protective innovation research.

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References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Impact sites as shown on an American football helmet that was used in Refs. [65,66,79]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Impact locations for the TBI dataset

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Impact locations for the PCS dataset

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