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Technical Brief

Evaluation of Hand Motion Capture Protocol Using Static Computed Tomography Images: Application to an Instrumented Glove

[+] Author and Article Information
James H. Buffi

Department of Biomedical Engineering,
Northwestern University,
Evanston, IL 60208;
Sensory Motor Performance Program (SMPP),
Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago,
345 East Superior Street,
Suite 1406,
Chicago, IL 60611
e-mail: jamesbuffi2013@u.northwestern.edu

Joaquín Luis Sancho Bru

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction,
Universitat Jaume I,
Castelló 12071, Spain
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction,
Universitat Jaume I,
Campus de Riu Sec,
Avinguda Vicent Sos Baynat, s/n,
Castelló 12071, Spain
e-mail: sancho@uji.es

Joseph J. Crisco

Mem ASME
Department of Orthopaedics,
Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital,
Providence, RI 02903
Warren Alpert Medical School,
Brown University,
1 Hoppin Street, Suite 404,
Coro West, Providence, RI 02903
e-mail: joseph_crisco@brown.edu

Wendy M. Murray

Department of Biomedical Engineering,
Northwestern University,
Evanston, IL 60208
Sensory Motor Performance Program (SMPP),
Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago,
345 East Superior Street,
Suite 1408B,
Chicago, IL 60611
Departments of PM&R and PTHMS,
Northwestern University,
Chicago, IL 60611
Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital,
Hines, IL 60141
e-mail: w-murray@northwestern.edu

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received February 4, 2014; final manuscript received August 25, 2014; accepted manuscript posted September 11, 2014; published online October 15, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Zong-Ming Li.

J Biomech Eng 136(12), 124501 (Oct 15, 2014) (6 pages) Paper No: BIO-14-1065; doi: 10.1115/1.4028521 History: Received February 04, 2014; Revised August 25, 2014; Accepted September 11, 2014

There has been a marked increase in the use of hand motion capture protocols in the past 20 yr. However, their absolute accuracies and precisions remain unclear. The purpose of this technical brief was to present a method for evaluating the accuracy and precision of the joint angles determined by a hand motion capture protocol using simultaneously collected static computed tomography (CT) images. The method consists of: (i) recording seven functional postures using both the motion capture protocol and a CT scanner; (ii) obtaining principal axes of the bones in each method; (iii) calculating the flexion angle at each joint for each method as the roll angle of the composite, sequential, roll-pitch-yaw rotations relating the orientation of the distal bone to the proximal bone; and (iv) comparing corresponding joint angle measurements. For demonstration, we applied the method to a Cyberglove protocol. Accuracy and precision of the instrumented-glove protocol were calculated as the mean and standard deviation, respectively, of the differences between the angles determined from the Cyberglove output and the CT images across the seven postures. Implementation in one subject highlighted substantial errors, especially for the distal joints of the fingers. This technical note both clearly demonstrates the need for future work and introduces a solid, technical approach with the potential to improve the current state of such assessments in our field.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

The number of publications mentioning “hand motion capture,” plotted as a function of publication year. Results are from a literature search of the years 1985–2012 in Elsevier's Engineering Village scientific database.

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Fig. 2

The seven postures used to evaluate the accuracy of the Cyberglove motion capture protocol

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Fig. 3

An example of a closed loop made between the current finger and thumb while the Cyberglove was calibrated to the subject

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Fig. 4

A comparison of the Cylinder grasp posture captured by the CT image (left) and the Cyberglove (right). The CT posture is shown using the digitized bone surfaces visualized in Matlab. The Cyberglove posture is shown using our adapted hand model in the Software for Interactive Musculoskeletal Modeling (SIMM; Musculographics, Inc.; Santa Rosa, CA).

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Fig. 5

A plot depicting a Bland and Altman assessment of limits of agreement for all corresponding pairs of Cyberglove and CT joint angle measurements. The differences between corresponding measurements were plotted on the vertical axis and the mean of the corresponding measurements were plotted on the horizontal axis. The solid black line represents the mean difference between corresponding measurements. The dashed black lines represent the lower and upper limits of agreement between which 95% of differences between measurements are expected.

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Fig. 6

A plot depicting a Bland and Altman assessment of limits of agreement for corresponding pairs of Cyberglove and CT joint angle measurements excluding the measurements taken from the most distal joint of each digit. The differences between corresponding measurements were plotted on the vertical axis and the mean of the corresponding measurements were plotted on the horizontal axis. The solid black line represents the mean difference between corresponding measurements. The dashed black lines represent the lower and upper limits of agreement between which 95% of differences between measurements are expected.

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