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Research Papers

Deflection Corridors of Abdomen and Thorax in Oblique Side Impacts Using Equal Stress Equal Velocity Approach: Comparison With Other Normalization Methods

[+] Author and Article Information
Narayan Yoganandan

Professor of Neurosurgery and Orthopaedic
Surgery, Chair, Biomedical Engineering,
Department of Neurosurgery,
Medical College of Wisconsin,
9200 West Wisconsin Avenue,
Milwaukee, WI 53226
e-mail: yoga@mcw.edu

Mike W. J. Arun, John Humm, Frank A. Pintar

Department of Neurosurgery,
Medical College of Wisconsin,
Milwaukee, WI 53226

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received December 3, 2013; final manuscript received June 27, 2014; accepted manuscript posted July 18, 2014; published online August 14, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Joel D. Stitzel.

J Biomech Eng 136(10), 101012 (Aug 14, 2014) (8 pages) Paper No: BIO-13-1565; doi: 10.1115/1.4028032 History: Received December 03, 2013; Revised June 27, 2014; Accepted July 18, 2014

The first objective of the study was to determine the thorax and abdomen deflection time corridors using the equal stress equal velocity approach from oblique side impact sled tests with postmortem human surrogates fitted with chestbands. The second purpose of the study was to generate deflection time corridors using impulse momentum methods and determine which of these methods best suits the data. An anthropometry-specific load wall was used. Individual surrogate responses were normalized to standard midsize male anthropometry. Corridors from the equal stress equal velocity approach were very similar to those from impulse momentum methods, thus either method can be used for this data. Present mean and plus/minus one standard deviation abdomen and thorax deflection time corridors can be used to evaluate dummies and validate complex human body finite element models.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

A perspective view of the entire load wall system showing plates for the shoulder (a), thorax (b), abdomen (c) and pelvis ((d) and (e)), and a separate plate (f) for the lower leg of the PMHS

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Fig. 2

Schematic showing the various load wall plates and the bench seat and the alignment and positioning of the load wall plates with respect to the PMHS anthropometry

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Fig. 3

Pretest contour (contour indicated by the longer arrow) and the deformed contour corresponding to the peak deflection vector (contour indicated by the shorter arrow) illustrating the extraction of deflection-time traces. The spine-sternum (bottom to top) is shown as dashed lines in the contours. The solid line with the arrow on the deformed contour indicates the vector from the origin to the point of maximum deflection, with the arrow end referring to the point of occurrence. The solid line with the arrow on the pretest contour indicates the vector to the same point (arrow head). Peak deflection is the difference between the two arrowhead lines. The dashed vertical line from the spine to sternum represents the y-axis and the line (not shown) perpendicular to this represents the x-axis with the origin at the middle of the vertical line.

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Fig. 4

Typical sled acceleration-time pulse

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Fig. 5

Non-normalized deflections for each specimen for the thorax. PMHS ID given in Table 2.

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Fig. 6

Non-normalized deflections for each specimen for the abdomen. PMHS ID given in Table 2.

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Fig. 7

Mean and plus/minus one standard deviation thorax deflection corridor obtained using equal stress equal velocity method (method a). Individual responses are also shown.

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Fig. 8

Mean and plus/minus one standard deviation abdomen deflection corridor obtained using the equal stress equal velocity method (method a)

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Fig. 15

Overlay of abdomen deflection time corridors from the three methods. ESEV: Equal stress equal velocity. IM-1: Impulse momentum method using effective mass and characteristic length approach. IM-2: Impulse momentum with effective mass, and effective stiffness and characteristic length approach.

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Fig. 14

Overlay of thorax deflection time corridors from the three methods ESEV: Equal stress equal velocity. IM-1: Impulse momentum method using effective mass and characteristic length approach. IM-2: Impulse momentum with effective mass, and effective stiffness and characteristic length approach.

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Fig. 13

Coefficients of variation from the three methods for the thorax and abdomen regions. ESEV: Equal stress equal velocity. IM-1: Impulse momentum method using effective mass and characteristic length approach. IM-2: Impulse momentum with effective mass, and effective stiffness and characteristic length approach.

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Fig. 12

Mean and plus/minus one standard deviation abdomen deflection corridor obtained using the impulse momentum method. Specimen-specific force and deflection data were used to determine the stiffness factor (method c).

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Fig. 11

Mean and plus/minus one standard deviation thorax deflection corridor obtained using the impulse momentum method. Specimen-specific force and deflection data were used to determine the stiffness factor (method c).

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Fig. 10

Mean and plus/minus one standard deviation abdomen deflection corridor obtained using the impulse momentum method. Characteristic length was used to determine the stiffness factor (method b).

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Fig. 9

Mean and plus/minus one standard deviation thorax deflection corridor obtained using the impulse momentum method. Characteristic length was used to determine the stiffness factor (method b).

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