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Research Papers

Theoretical Simulation of Temperature Elevations in a Joint Wear Simulator During Rotations

[+] Author and Article Information
Alireza Chamani, L. D. Timmie Topoleski

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Maryland Baltimore County,
Baltimore, MD 21250

Hitesh P. Mehta, Martin K. McDermott

Food and Drug Administration,
Center for Devices and Radiological Health,
Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, Division of Chemistry and Materials Science,
Silver Spring, MD 20993

Manel Djeffal, Gaurav Nayyar, Dinesh V. Patwardhan

Food and Drug Administration,
Center for Devices and Radiological Health,
Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories,
Division of Chemistry and Materials Science,
Silver Spring, MD 20993

Anilchandra Attaluri

Radiation Oncology
& Molecular Radiation Sciences,
Johns Hopkins University,
Baltimore, MD 21205

Liang Zhu

Associate Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Maryland Baltimore County,
Baltimore, MD 21250
e-mail: zliang@umbc.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Bioengineering Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Biomechanical Engineering. Manuscript received August 30, 2013; final manuscript received November 25, 2013; accepted manuscript posted December 5, 2013; published online February 5, 2014. Editor: Victor H. Barocas.

J Biomech Eng 136(2), 021027 (Feb 05, 2014) (6 pages) Paper No: BIO-13-1394; doi: 10.1115/1.4026158 History: Received August 30, 2013; Revised November 25, 2013; Accepted December 05, 2013

The objective of this study is to develop a theoretical model to simulate temperature fields in a joint simulator for various bearing conditions using finite element analyses. The frictional heat generation rate at the interface between a moving pin and a stationary base is modeled as a boundary heat source. Both the heat source and the pin are rotating on the base. We are able to conduct a theoretical study to show the feasibility of using the COMSOL software package to simulate heat transfer in a domain with moving components and a moving boundary source term. The finite element model for temperature changes agrees in general trends with experimental data. Heat conduction occurs primarily in the highly conductive base component, and high temperature elevation is confined to the vicinity of the interface in the pin. Thirty rotations of a polyethylene pin on a cobalt-chrome base for 60 s generate more than 2.26 °C in the temperature elevation from its initial temperature of 25 °C at the interface in a baseline model with a rotation frequency of 0.5 Hz. A higher heat generation rate is the direct result of a faster rotation frequency associated with intensity of exercise, and it results in doubling the temperature elevations when the frequency is increased by100%. Temperature elevations of more than 7.5 °C occur at the interface when the friction force is tripled from that in the baseline model. The theoretical modeling approach developed in this study can be used in the future to test different materials, different material compositions, and different heat generation rates at the interface under various body and environmental conditions.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

The experimental setup of the joint simulator and the computer modeling of the pin and the base: (a) experimental setup, (b) top view of the computer model, and (c) side view of the computer model

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Fig. 2

The 3D images during the simulation of one rotation of the pin on the base. All images are taken from the same angle. Notice the movement of the pin on the base.

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Fig. 3

Side view of the simulated temperature fields in the pin and the base at the initial condition (a), at end of the 5th (b), the 10th (c), 15th (d), 20th (e), and 25th (f) rotation

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Fig. 4

Top view of the simulated temperature fields on the top surface of the base at the initial condition (a), at end of the 5th (b), the 10th (c), 15th (d), 20th (e), and 25th (f) rotation. The black circle in (f) represents the location of the interface between the pin and base.

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Fig. 5

Effect of the rotation frequency on the averaged temperature at the interface between the pin and the base

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Fig. 6

Effect of the friction force on the averaged temperature at the interface between the pin and the base

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