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Research Papers

Finite Element Model of the Knee for Investigation of Injury Mechanisms: Development and Validation

[+] Author and Article Information
Ali Kiapour

Engineering Center for Orthopaedic
Research Excellence (ECORE),
Departments of Orthopaedics and Bioengineering,
University of Toledo,
5051 Nitschke Hall MS 303,
2801 W. Bancroft St.,
Toledo, OH 43606
e-mail: kiapour@asme.org

Ata M. Kiapour

Engineering Center for Orthopaedic
Research Excellence (ECORE),
Departments of Orthopaedics and Bioengineering,
University of Toledo,
Toledo, OH 43606
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery,
Boston Children's Hospital,
Harvard Medical School,
300 Longwood Ave.,
Enders 270.2,
Boston, MA 02115
e-mail: ata.kiapour@childrens.harvard.edu

Vikas Kaul

Engineering Center for Orthopaedic
Research Excellence (ECORE),
Departments of Orthopaedics and Bioengineering,
University of Toledo,
5051 Nitschke Hall MS 303,
2801 W. Bancroft St.,
Toledo, OH 43606
e-mail: vikaskaul@gmail.com

Carmen E. Quatman

Sports Health and Performance Institute,
The Ohio State University,
Columbus, OH 43221
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery,
The Ohio State University,
2050 Kenny Road, Suite 3100,
Columbus, OH 43210
e-mail: carmen.quatman@osumc.edu

Samuel C. Wordeman

Sports Health and Performance Institute,
The Ohio State University,
Columbus, OH 43221
Department of Biomedical Engineering,
The Ohio State University,
2050 Kenny Road, Suite 3100,
Columbus, OH 43210
e-mail: wordemans@gmail.com

Timothy E. Hewett

Sports Health and Performance Institute,
The Ohio State University,
Columbus, OH 43221
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery,
The Ohio State University,
Columbus, OH 43203
Department of Biomedical Engineering,
The Ohio State University,
Columbus, OH 43210
Departments of Physiology and Cell Biology,
Family Medicine and the School of Health
and Rehabilitation Sciences,
2050 Kenny Road, Suite 3100,
Columbus, OH 43210;
e-mail: timothy.hewett@osumc.edu

Constantine K. Demetropoulos

Biomechanics and Injury Mitigation Systems,
Research and Exploratory Development Department,
The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory,
11100 Johns Hopkins Road Mail Stop: MP2-N143,
Laurel, MD 20723
e-mail: constantine.demetropoulos@jhuapl.edu

Vijay K. Goel

Endowed Chair and McMaster-Gardner Professor of
Orthopaedic Bioengineering,
Co-Director of
Engineering Center for Orthopaedic
Research Excellence (ECORE),
Departments of Orthopaedics and Bioengineering,
University of Toledo,
5051 Nitschke Hall MS 303,
2801 W. Bancroft St.,
Toledo, OH 43606
e-mail: vijay.goel@utoledo.edu

1Corresponding author. Present address: 5051 NI, MS 303, College of Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606.

Contributed by the Bioengineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF BIOMECHANICAL ENGINEERING. Manuscript received March 11, 2013; final manuscript received October 3, 2013; accepted manuscript posted October 11, 2013; published online November 26, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Tammy Haut Donahue.

J Biomech Eng 136(1), 011002 (Nov 26, 2013) (14 pages) Paper No: BIO-13-1126; doi: 10.1115/1.4025692 History: Received March 11, 2013; Revised October 03, 2013; Accepted October 11, 2013

Multiple computational models have been developed to study knee biomechanics. However, the majority of these models are mainly validated against a limited range of loading conditions and/or do not include sufficient details of the critical anatomical structures within the joint. Due to the multifactorial dynamic nature of knee injuries, anatomic finite element (FE) models validated against multiple factors under a broad range of loading conditions are necessary. This study presents a validated FE model of the lower extremity with an anatomically accurate representation of the knee joint. The model was validated against tibiofemoral kinematics, ligaments strain/force, and articular cartilage pressure data measured directly from static, quasi-static, and dynamic cadaveric experiments. Strong correlations were observed between model predictions and experimental data (r > 0.8 and p < 0.0005 for all comparisons). FE predictions showed low deviations (root-mean-square (RMS) error) from average experimental data under all modes of static and quasi-static loading, falling within 2.5 deg of tibiofemoral rotation, 1% of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL) strains, 17 N of ACL load, and 1 mm of tibiofemoral center of pressure. Similarly, the FE model was able to accurately predict tibiofemoral kinematics and ACL and MCL strains during simulated bipedal landings (dynamic loading). In addition to minimal deviation from direct cadaveric measurements, all model predictions fell within 95% confidence intervals of the average experimental data. Agreement between model predictions and experimental data demonstrates the ability of the developed model to predict the kinematics of the human knee joint as well as the complex, nonuniform stress and strain fields that occur in biological soft tissue. Such a model will facilitate the in-depth understanding of a multitude of potential knee injury mechanisms with special emphasis on ACL injury.

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References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

FE predictions versus experimental data of the uniaxial tension test for ACL and PCL (top) and MCL (bottom)

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Fig. 6

FE predictions versus experimental data for ACL strain under quasi-static isolated and combined abduction moments (shaded area represent experimental 95% confidence intervals)

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Fig. 7

FE predictions versus experimental data for MCL strain under quasi-static isolated and combined internal rotation moments (shaded area represent experimental 95% confidence intervals)

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Fig. 1

Developed FE model of lower extremity ACL: anterior cruciate ligament; PCL: posterior cruciate ligament; FCL: fibular collateral ligament; sMCL, dMCL and oMCL: superficial, deep and oblique bundles of medial collateral ligament; CAPm, CAPl, CAPo and CAPa: medial, lateral, oblique popliteal and arcuate popliteal bundles of posterior capsule; ALS: anterolateral structure; PFL: popliteofibular ligament; MPFL: medial patellofemoral ligament; LPFL: lateral patellofemoral ligament; PT: patellar tendon; VM: vastus medialis; RF: rectus femoris; VI: vastus intermidus; VL: vastus lateralis; BFLH: biceps femoris long head; BFSH: biceps femoris short head; SM: semimembranous; ST: semitendinosus; SR: sartorius; GA: gracilis; GM: gastrocnemius medial; GL: gastrocnemius lateral.

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Fig. 3

FE predictions versus experimental data for tibiofemoral axial plane kinematics under quasi-static loading conditions (shaded area represent experimental 95% confidence intervals)

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Fig. 4

FE predictions versus experimental data for tibiofemoral frontal plane kinematics under quasi-static loading conditions (shaded area represent experimental 95% confidence intervals)

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Fig. 5

FE predictions versus experimental data for ACL strain under quasi-static isolated and combined internal rotation moments (shaded area represent experimental 95% confidence intervals)

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Fig. 8

FE predictions versus experimental data for medial compartment COP translation under quasi-static loading conditions (shaded area represent experimental 95% confidence intervals)

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Fig. 9

FE predictions versus experimental data for lateral compartment COP translation under quasi-static loading conditions (shaded area represent experimental 95% confidence intervals)

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Fig. 10

Pressure distribution across the tibial articular cartilage under functional loading conditions obtained experimentally (top) and predicted by the FE model (bottom)

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Fig. 11

FE predictions versus experimental data for ACL force under simulated static loading conditions (error bars represent experimental 95% confidence intervals)

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