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Research Papers

Three-Dimensional Modeling of Supine Human and Transport System Under Whole-Body Vibration

[+] Author and Article Information
Yang Wang

e-mail: yang-wang@uiowa.edu

Salam Rahmatalla

e-mail: salam-rahmatalla@uiowa.edu
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering,
College of Engineering,
The University of Iowa,
Iowa City, IA 52242;
Center for Computer-Aided Design,
College of Engineering,
The University of Iowa,
Iowa City, IA 52242

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Bioengineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF BIOMECHANICAL ENGINEERING. Manuscript received November 30, 2012; final manuscript received March 28, 2013; accepted manuscript posted April 8, 2013; published online May 9, 2013. Editor: Beth Winkelstein.

J Biomech Eng 135(6), 061010 (May 09, 2013) (13 pages) Paper No: BIO-12-1590; doi: 10.1115/1.4024164 History: Received November 30, 2012; Revised March 28, 2013; Accepted April 08, 2013

The development of predictive computer human models in whole-body vibration has shown some success in predicting simple types of motion, mostly for seated positions and in the uniaxial vertical direction. The literature revealed only a handful of papers that tackled supine human modeling in response to vertical vibration. The objective of this work is to develop a predictive, multibody, three-dimensional human model to simulate the supine human and underlying transport system in response to multidirectional whole-body vibration. A three-dimensional dynamic model of a supine human and its underlying transport system is presented in this work to predict supine-human biodynamic response under three-dimensional input random whole-body vibration. The proposed supine-human model consists of three interconnected segments representing the head, torso-arms, and pelvis-legs. The segments are connected via rotational and translational joints that have spring-damper components simulating the three-dimensional muscles and tissuelike connecting elements in the three x, y, and z directions. Two types of transport systems are considered in this work, a rigid support and a long spinal board attached to a standard military litter. The contact surfaces between the supine human and the underlying transport system are modeled using spring-damper components. Eight healthy supine human subjects were tested under combined-axis vibration files with a magnitude of 0.5 m/s2 (rms) and a frequency content of 0.5–16 Hz. The data from seven subjects were used in parameter identification for the dynamic model using optimization schemes in the frequency domain that minimize the differences between the magnitude and phase of the predicted and experimental transmissibility. The predicted accelerations in the time and frequency domains were comparable to those gathered from experiments under different anthropometric, input vibration, and transport conditions under investigation. Based on the results, the proposed dynamic model has the potential to be used to provide motion data to drive a detailed finite element model of a supine human for further investigation of muscle forces and joint dynamics. The predicted kinematics of the supine human and transport system would also benefit patient safety planners and vibration suppression designers in their endeavors.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Supine-human setups and experimentation (a) rigid case, (b) litter-board case

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Fig. 2

Components of the supine-human model. S1, S2, and S3 comprise damping and stiffness components of the contact surfaces between the head, torso, and pelvis, respectively.

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Fig. 4

Transmissibility between the input acceleration at the rigid-platform level and the output accelerations at points on the head, torso, and pelvis under the litter-board condition. The light gray lines represent the transmissibility of the individual subjects, the solid dark line represents the geometrical transmissibility of the subjects, and the dotted line represents the optimized transmissibility of the model.

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Fig. 3

Transmissibility between the input acceleration at the rigid-platform level and the output accelerations at points on the head, torso, and pelvis under the rigid condition. The light gray lines represent the transmissibility of the individual subjects, the solid dark line represents the geometrical transmissibility of the subjects, and the dotted line represents the optimized transmissibility of the model.

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Fig. 8

Comparison between the predicted and experimental 3D acceleration of the head, torso, and pelvis in the time domain under the litter-board condition. Figures in the right column represent a snapshot of the circles shown in the left columns.

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Fig. 7

Comparison between the predicted and experimental 3D acceleration of the head, torso, and pelvis in the time domain under the rigid condition. Figures in the right column represent a snapshot of the circles shown in the left columns.

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Fig. 6

Comparison between the predicted and experimental 3D acceleration of the head, torso, and pelvis in the frequency domain under the litter-board condition. Figures in the right column represent a snapshot of the circles shown in the left columns.

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Fig. 5

Comparison between the predicted and experimental 3D acceleration of the head, torso, and pelvis in the frequency domain under the rigid condition. Figures in the right column represent a snapshot of the circles shown in the left columns.

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