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Research Papers

On the Importance of Modeling Stent Procedure for Predicting Arterial Mechanics

[+] Author and Article Information
Shijia Zhao

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering,
University of Nebraska-Lincoln,
Lincoln, NE 68588-0656

Linxia Gu

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering,
University of Nebraska-Lincoln,
Lincoln, NE 68588-0656
Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience,
Lincoln, NE 68588-0656
e-mail: lgu2@unl.edu

Stacey R. Froemming

Hybrid Catheterization and Electrophysiology Laboratory,
Children's Hospital and Medical Center,
Omaha, NE 68114-4133

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Bioengineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF BIOMECHANICAL ENGINEERING Manuscript received July 9, 2012; final manuscript received November 3, 2012; accepted manuscript posted November 28, 2012; published online December 5, 2012. Assoc. Editor: Tim David.

J Biomech Eng 134(12), 121005 (Dec 05, 2012) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4023094 History: Received July 09, 2012; Revised November 03, 2012; Accepted November 28, 2012

The stent-artery interactions have been increasingly studied using the finite element method for better understanding of the biomechanical environment changes on the artery and its implications. However, the deployment of balloon-expandable stents was generally simplified without considering the balloon-stent interactions, the initial crimping process of the stent, its overexpansion routinely used in the clinical practice, or its recoil process. In this work, the stenting procedure was mimicked by incorporating all the above-mentioned simplifications. The impact of various simplifications on the stent-induced arterial stresses was systematically investigated. The plastic strain history of stent and its resulted geometrical variations, as well as arterial mechanics were quantified and compared. Results showed the model without considering the stent crimping process underestimating the minimum stent diameter by 17.2%, and overestimating the maximum radial recoil by 144%. It was also suggested that overexpansion resulted in a larger stent diameter, but a greater radial recoil ratio and larger intimal area with high stress were also obtained along with the increase in degree of overexpansion.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
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Copyright © 2012 by ASME
Topics: Stress , stents , Modeling
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Figures

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Fig. 1

The three-dimensional model of the complete stenting system before expansion: nominal state (top), crimped state (middle), and delivery to target lesion (bottom)

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Fig. 2

Mechanical behavior of artery and plaque

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Fig. 3

The equivalent plastic strain (PEEQ) variation during the stenting process

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Fig. 4

The contour plot of the PEEQ of the stent unit at crimping state (left), fully expanded state (middle), and equilibrium state after recoil (right)

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Fig. 5

The contact pressure distribution on the plaque at the fully expanded state of the stent (top) as well as after stent recoil (bottom)

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Fig. 6

The maximum principal stress map on the artery at the fully expanded state of the stent (top) as well as after stent recoil (bottom)

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Fig. 7

The probability distribution of maximum principal stress on the intima

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Fig. 8

The impact of overexpansion on the radial recoil, foreshortening, as well as PEEQ of the stent

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Fig. 9

The impact of overexpansion on the probability distribution of maximum principal stress on intima after recoil

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