0
TECHNICAL PAPERS

A Numerical Analysis of Phonation Using a Two-Dimensional Flexible Channel Model of the Vocal Folds

[+] Author and Article Information
Tadashige Ikeda, Yuji Matsuzaki, Tatsuya Aomatsu

Department of Aerospace Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 Japan

J Biomech Eng 123(6), 571-579 (Jul 25, 2001) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1408939 History: Received May 31, 2000; Revised July 25, 2001
Copyright © 2001 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Ishizaka,  K., and Flanagan,  J. L., 1972, “Synthesis of Voiced Sounds From a Two-Mass Model of the Vocal Cords,” Bell Syst. Tech. J., 51, pp. 1233–1268.
van den Berg,  Jw., Zantema,  J. T., and Doornenbal,  P., 1957, “On the Air Resistance and the Bernoulli Effect of the Human Larynx,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 29, pp. 626–631.
Story,  B. H., and Titze,  I. R., 1997, “Voice Simulation With a Body-Cover Model of the Vocal Folds,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 97, pp. 1249–1260.
Koizumi,  T., Taniguchi,  S., and Hiromitsu,  S., 1987, “Two-Mass Models of the Vocal Cords for Natural Sounding Voice Synthesis,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 82, pp. 1179–1192.
Pelorson,  X., Hirschberg,  A., van Hassel,  R. R., and Wijnanads,  A. P., 1994, “Theoretical and Experimental Study of Quasisteady-Flow Separation Within the Glottis During Phonation. Application to a Modified Two-Mass Model,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 96, pp. 3416–3431.
Titze,  I. R., 1973, “The Human Vocal Cords: A Mathematical Model Part I,” Phonetica, 28, pp. 129–170.
Wong,  D., Ito,  M. R., and Nicol,  T., 1987, “Simulation of Vocal Fold Oscillation Using a Lumped Mass-Spring Approach,” Int. J. Model. Simulat., 7, pp. 62–67.
Titze,  I. R., and Talkin,  T., 1979, “A Theoretical Study of the Effects of Various Laryngeal Configurations on the Acoustic of Phonation,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 66, pp. 60–74.
Kagawa,  Y., Yamabuchi,  T., and Shimoyama,  R., 1982, “Finite Element Simulation of Vocal Cords Oscillation [in Japanese],” Simulation, 1, pp. 106–112.
Kamm,  R. D., and Pedley,  T. J., 1989, “Flow in Collapsible Tubes: A Brief Review,” ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 111, pp. 177–179.
Pedley,  T. J., and Luo,  X. Y., 1998, “Modelling Flow and Oscillations in Collapsible Tubes,” Theor. Comput. Fluid Dyn., 10, pp. 277–294.
Conrad,  W. A., 1980, “A New Model of the Vocal Cords Based on a Collapsible Tube Analogy,” Med. Res. Eng., 13, pp. 7–10.
Berke,  G. S., Green,  D. C., Smith,  M. E., Arnstein,  D. P., and Conrad,  W. A., 1991, “Experimental Evidence in the in Vivo Canine for the Collapsible Tube Model of Phonation,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 89, pp. 1358–1363.
Matsuzaki,  Y., and Matsumoto,  T., 1989, “Flow in a Two-Dimensional Collapsible Channel With Rigid Inlet and Outlet,” ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 111, pp. 180–184.
Matsuzaki,  Y., Ikeda,  T., Kitagawa,  T., and Sakata,  S., 1994, “Analysis of Flow in a Two-Dimensional Collapsible Channel Using Universal ‘Tube’ Law,” ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 116, pp. 469–476.
Ikeda,  T., Matsuzaki,  Y., and Sasaki,  T., 1994, “Separated Flow in a Channel With an Oscillating Constriction (Numerical Analysis and Experiment) [in Japanese],” JSME Int. J., Ser. B, 60, pp. 750–757.
Ikeda,  T., and Matsuzaki,  Y., 1999, “A One-Dimensional Unsteady Separable and Reattachable Flow Model for Collapsible Tube-Flow Analysis,” ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 121, pp. 153–159.
Matsuzaki,  Y., Ikeda,  T., Matsumoto,  T., and Kitagawa,  T., 1998, “Experiments on Steady and Oscillatory Flows at Moderate Reynolds Numbers in a Quasi-Two-Dimensional Channel With a Throat,” ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 120, pp. 594–601.
Ikeda,  T., and Matsuzaki,  Y., 1994, “Synthesis of Voiced Sound With a One-Dimensional Unsteady Glottal Flow Model [in Japanese],” JSME Int. J., Ser. B, 60, pp. 1226–1233.
Ikeda, T., and Matsuzaki, Y., 1994, “Flow Theory for Analysis of Phonation With a Membrane Model of Vocal Cord,” Proc. ICSLP 94, Vol. 2, pp. 643–646.
Iijima,  H., Miki,  N., and Nagai,  N., 1992, “Glottal Impedance Based on a Finite Element Analysis of Two-Dimensional Unsteady Viscous Flow in a Static Glottis,” IEEE Trans. Signal Process., 40, pp. 2125–2135.
Guo,  C.-G., and Scherer,  C., 1993, “Finite Element Simulation of Glottal Flow and Pressure,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 94, pp. 688–700.
Morse, P. M., 1948, Vibration and Sound, pp. 326–333, McGraw-Hill, New York.
Scherer,  R. C., Titze,  I. R., and Curtis,  J. F., 1983, “Pressure–Flow Relationships in Two Models of the Larynx Having Rectangular Glottal Shapes,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 73, pp. 668–676.
Baer,  T., Gore,  J. C., Gracco,  L. C., and Nye,  P. W., 1991, “Analysis of Vocal Tract Shape and Dimensions Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Vowels,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 90, pp. 799–828.
Kakita, Y., Hirano, M., and Ohmaru, K., 1981, “Physical Properties of the Vocal Fold Tissue: Measurements on Excised Larynges,” Vocal Fold Physiology, University of Tokyo Press, pp. 377–397.
Cranen,  B., and Boves,  L., 1985, “Pressure Measurements During Speech Production Using Semiconductor Miniature Pressure Transducers: Impact on Models for Speech Production,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 77, pp. 1543–1551.
Kakita,  Y., Hirano,  M., Kawasaki,  H., and Matsushita,  H., 1976, “Schematical Presentation of Vibration of the Vocal Cord as a Layer-Structured Vibrator—Normal Larynges [in Japanese],” J. Otolaryngology Japan, 79, pp. 1333–1340.

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Schematic diagram of an airway model, where the larynx is a frontal section although the vocal tract is a sagittal section
Grahic Jump Location
Configuration of the true and false vocal folds for Bex=0.0002 m
Grahic Jump Location
Area distributions of the vocal tract for /a/ and /i/, where the horizontal axis is the distance from the upstream end of the vocal tract
Grahic Jump Location
Waveforms for /a/ in the nonresonance–noncollision case. They are from the top to the bottom, the total and static pressures at the mouth, TP and Pm, which are represented, respectively, by solid and broken curves, the static pressures at the up- and downstream ends of the glottis, Psb and Psp, represented by solid and broken curves, the time derivative of the flow rate at the downstream end of the glottis, Qsp, t, the flow rate at the up- and downstream ends of the glottis, Qsb and Qsp, represented by solid and broken curves, and a half of the width at the downstream end of the glottis, Bsp.
Grahic Jump Location
Spectrum of the total pressure at the mouth for the case of Fig. 4, where arrows indicate the resonant frequencies of the vocal tract
Grahic Jump Location
Instantaneous frontal cross sections of the vocal fold at every 0.002 s from 0.055 s to 0.065 s for the case of Fig. 4
Grahic Jump Location
Waveforms for /i/ in the nonresonance–noncollision case
Grahic Jump Location
Spectrum of the total pressure at the mouth for the case of Fig. 7
Grahic Jump Location
Waveforms for /a/ in the resonance–noncollision case
Grahic Jump Location
Spectrum of the total pressure at the mouth for the case of Fig. 9
Grahic Jump Location
Waveforms for /i/ in the resonance–noncollision case
Grahic Jump Location
Spectrum of the total pressure at the mouth for the case of Fig. 11
Grahic Jump Location
Waveforms for /a/ in the resonance–collision case. They are from the top to the bottom, the total pressures at the mount, TP, the static pressures at the up- and downstream ends of the glottis, Psb and Psp, represented by solid and broken curves, the flow rate at the up- and downstream ends of the glottis, Qsb and Qsp, and a half of the width at the downstream end of the glottis, Bsp.
Grahic Jump Location
Spectrum of the total pressure at the mouth for the case of Fig. 13
Grahic Jump Location
Instantaneous frontal cross sections of the vocal fold at every 0.002 s from 0.059 s to 0.069 s for the case of Fig. 13
Grahic Jump Location
Waveforms for /i/ in the resonance–collision case
Grahic Jump Location
Spectrum of the total pressure at the mouth for the case of Fig. 16

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In