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Technical Briefs

An Approach to Determine Pressure Profile Generated by Compression Bandage Using Quasi-Linear Viscoelastic Model

[+] Author and Article Information
Bipin Kumar, R. Alagirusamy

 Department of Textile Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi, PIN–110016, India

Apurba Das1

 Department of Textile Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi, PIN–110016, Indiaapurba@textile.iitd.ernet.in

1

Corresponding author.

J Biomech Eng 134(9), 094501 (Aug 27, 2012) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007176 History: Received January 02, 2012; Revised June 28, 2012; Posted July 18, 2012; Published August 27, 2012; Online August 27, 2012

Understanding the stress relaxation behavior of the compression bandage could be very useful in determining the behavior of the interface pressure exerted by the bandage on a limb during the course of the compression treatment. There has been no comprehensive study in the literature to investigate the pressure profile (interface pressure with time) generated by a compression bandage when applied at different levels of strain. The present study attempts to describe the pressure profile, with the use of a quasi-linear viscoelastic model, generated by a compression bandage during compression therapy. The quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) theory proposed by Fung (Fung, 1972, “Stress Strain History Relations of Soft Tissues in Simple Elongation,” Biomechanics: Its Foundations and Objectives, Y. C. Fung, N. Perrone, and M. Anliker, eds., Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, pp. 181–207). was used to model the nonlinear time- and history-dependent relaxation behavior of the bandage using the ramp strain approach. The regression analysis was done to find the correlation between the pressure profile and the relaxation behavior of the bandage. The parameters of the QLV model, describing the relaxation behavior of the bandage, were used to determine the pressure profile generated by the bandage at different levels of strain. The relaxation behaviors of the bandage at different levels of strain were well described by the QLV model parameters. A high correlation coefficient (nearly 0.98) shows a good correlation of the pressure profile with the stress relaxation behavior of the bandage.The prediction of the pressure profile using the QLV model parameters were in agreement with the experimental data. The pressure profile generated by a compression bandage could be predicted using the QLV model describing the nonlinear relaxation behavior of the bandage. This new application of the QLV theory helps in evaluating the bandage performance during compression therapy as scientific wound care management.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic diagram of the prototype used for measuring interface pressure

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Figure 2

The behavior of stress relaxation as determined from the QLV model using the ramp strain approach (α = 1.66%/s during ramping) for the bandage at 75% strain

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Figure 3

Correlation between the pressure profile and the stress relaxation data at different levels of strains

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Figure 4

A typical residual plot to show systematic deviations of the regression model and the experimental data at the 75% strain level

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Figure 5

Prediction of the pressure profile at different strains using relaxation parameters. The average values of A and B, obtained from the least squares method, are 2.788 and 0.021, respectively.

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