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Research Papers

Experimental Validation of Finite Element Models of Intact and Implanted Composite Hemipelvises Using Digital Image Correlation

[+] Author and Article Information
Rajesh Ghosh

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721 302, West Bengal, Indiarghosh.iitkgp@gmail.com

Sanjay Gupta

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721 302, West Bengal, Indiasangupta@mech.iitkgp.ernet.in

Alexander Dickinson

Bioengineering Science Research Group,  School of Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton S017 1BJ, United Kingdomalex.dickinson@soton.ac.uk

Martin Browne

Bioengineering Science Research Group,  School of Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton S017 1BJ, United Kingdomdoctor@soton.ac.uk

J Biomech Eng 134(8), 081003 (Aug 06, 2012) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007173 History: Received November 15, 2011; Revised July 08, 2012; Accepted July 14, 2012; Posted July 18, 2012; Published August 06, 2012; Online August 06, 2012

A detailed understanding of the changes in load transfer due to implantation is necessary to identify potential failure mechanisms of orthopedic implants. Computational finite element (FE) models provide full field data on intact and implanted bone structures, but their validity must be assessed for clinical relevance. The aim of this study was to test the validity of FE predicted strain distributions for the intact and implanted pelvis using the digital image correlation (DIC) strain measurement technique. FE models of an in vitro hemipelvis test setup were produced, both intact and implanted with an acetabular cup. Strain predictions were compared to DIC and strain rosette measurements. Regression analysis indicated a strong linear relationship between the measured and predicted strains, with a high correlation coefficient (R = 0.956 intact, 0.938 implanted) and a low standard error of the estimate (SE = 69.53 με, 75.09 με). Moreover, close agreement between the strain rosette and DIC measurements improved confidence in the validity of the DIC technique. The FE model therefore was supported as a valid predictor of the measured strain distribution in the intact and implanted composite pelvis models, confirming its suitability for further computational investigations.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 3

Location of strain rosettes and experimental setup for strain rosette experiment

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Figure 4

FE models of the composite pelvises

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Figure 1

Fixture used to hold the pelvises, (a) lateral view showing speckle pattern and posterior view, and (b) schematic representation of the support conditions; fixed boundary condition applied at sacro-iliac joint and supero-posterior part of the ilium, displacements are restrained along outward normal directions on the three faces of the pubis

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Figure 2

The experimental setup for DIC measurement along with the loading mechanism for the pelvis

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Figure 5

Distributions of von Mises strain (με) in the tested pelvises, (a) DIC measured: intact; (b) FE predicted: intact; (c) DIC measured: implanted; and (d) FE predicted: implanted

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Figure 6

Measured DIC strain (με) plotted against FE predicted strain (με) with respect to the ideal line (slope = 1, intercept = 0) for load 1400 N, (a) intact pelvis and (b) implanted pelvis

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Figure 7

DIC measured principal strain (με) distributions, (a) first principal: intact; (b) first principal: implanted; (c) second principal: intact; and (d) second principal: implanted

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Figure 8

Comparison of DIC measured principal strains in the virtual strain gauge area for the intact and the implanted pelvises

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