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TECHNICAL PAPERS

In Vivo Modeling of Interstitial Pressure in the Brain Under Surgical Load Using Finite Elements

[+] Author and Article Information
Michael I. Miga

Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755e-mail: michael.miga@dartmouth.edu

Keith D. Paulsen, P. Jack Hoopes

Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH 03766 Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Lebanon, NH 03766

Francis E. Kennedy

Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755

Alex Hartov

Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH 03766

David W. Roberts

Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH 03766Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Lebanon, NH 03766

J Biomech Eng 122(4), 354-363 (Mar 22, 2000) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1288207 History: Received March 09, 1999; Revised March 22, 2000
Copyright © 2000 by ASME
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Figures

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Fluoroscope image showing needle descending into the cranium (a) and a cluster of three beads (b). Each bead was implanted in a separate sagittal plane but at the same relative insertion depth and anterior/posterior location.
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MR axial brain slice (left) and corresponding model counterpart shown within the finite element tetrahedral surface mesh (right) where element-thresholded white/gray matter segmentation has been used
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Post-mortem brain sections (full view top, bead close-ups bottom) from two different pig piston experiments
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Finite element boundary condition distribution shown with (Surface 1) as the outer fixed nondraining cortical surface, (Surface 2(a)) as the area of piston application and (Surface 2(b)) as the nondraining tenting dura surrounding the piston, (Surface 3) as the brain stem, which is stress-free, with an interstitial pressure of 0 mmHg, and (Surface 4) as fixed with the new sulcal draining condition
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CT slice from a pig experiment with ICP transducers readily visible. The temporally located translating piston can also be seen contacting the brain surface.
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Experimental pressure data (a, b, c) for 3 in vivo piston experiments with transducers located in the frontal lobes of the left and right hemisphere (displacement offsets for the three experiments measured from the baseline CT were 0 mm, 1 mm, and 1.2 mm, respectively).
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Model calculated pressure data (a, b, c) for three in vivo piston experiments with transducers located in the frontal lobes of the left and right hemisphere
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Calculations illustrating the propagation of pressure for the three experiments at 10 mm of piston-induced deformation in coronal slices along the centerline with (a) t=180 s, (b) t=540 s, (c) t=900 s. The left-most panels show the typical propagation of pressure in sagittal slices along the centerline. Note that shadings presented have been normalized to the maximum, which is listed under the respective figures and the minimum pressure in all figures is 0 mmHg. Also note that the superscripted asterisk indicates that maximum pressure is applied at piston surface as determined from the calibration curve in Miga et al. 37.
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Calculations analyzing the changes in bead displacement at 10 mm of piston-induced deformation during the transient with (a) t=180 s, (b) t=900 s. In each figure, the top two subfigures and bottom subfigure are x,y, and z displacement, respectively, with the bottom right subfigure being total displacement.
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Illustrations demonstrating how average/maximum total displacement error changes throughout the transient period at 10 mm of piston-induced deformation by showing (a) absolute average/maximum error over the three calculations in millimeters, (b) percent recapture over the three calculations

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