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Research Papers

Biomechanical Evaluation of an Anatomically Correct All-Ceramic Tooth-Crown System Configuration: Core Layer Multivariate Analysis Incorporating Clinically Relevant Variables

[+] Author and Article Information
Brian T. Rafferty, Van P. Thompson, Paulo G. Coelho

Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University, 345 East 24th Street, Room 804s, New York, NY 10010

Estevam A. Bonfante1

Private Practice, Rua Vivaldo Guimarães 17-62, Bauru, Sao Paulo 17012120, Brazilestevamab@gmail.com

Malvin N. Janal

Department of Epidemiology, New York University, 250 Park Avenue South, New York, NY 10003

Nelson R. F. A. Silva

Department of Prosthodontics, New York University, 345 East 24th Street, Room 804s, New York, NY 10010

Elizabeth D. Rekow

 New York University, 1225 Bobst, 70 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10010

1

Corresponding author.

J Biomech Eng 132(5), 051001 (Mar 24, 2010) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001046 History: Received November 24, 2009; Revised January 09, 2010; Posted January 19, 2010; Published March 24, 2010; Online March 24, 2010

In a crown system, core fracture requires replacement of the restoration. Understanding maximum principal stress concentration in the veneered core of a tooth-crown system as a function of variations in clinically relevant parameters is crucial in the rational design of crown systems. This study evaluated the main and interacting effects of a set of clinical variables on the maximum principal stress (MPS) in the core of an anatomically correct veneer-core-cement-tooth model. A 3D CAD model of a mandibular first molar crown was generated; tooth preparation was modeled by reducing the proximal walls by 1.5 mm and the occlusal surface by 2.0 mm. A cemented veneered core crown was modeled on the preparation. This “crown system” permitted finite element model investigation of the main and interacting effects of proximal wall height reduction, core material, core thickness, cement modulus, cement thickness, and load position on the maximum stress distribution in a factorial design. Analysis of variance was used to identify the main and interacting influences on the level of MPS in the crown core. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. MPS levels varied as a function of two-way interactions between the following: core thickness and load position; cement thickness and load position; cement modulus and load position; cement thickness and core thickness; and cement thickness and cement modulus; and also three-way interactions among the load position, core material, and proximal wall height reduction, and among the core thickness, cement thickness, and cement modulus. MPS in the crown-tooth system is influenced by the design parameters and also by the interaction among them. Hence, while the geometry of molar crowns is complex, these analyses identify the factors that influence MPS and suggest levels that will minimize the core MPS in future studies of crown design.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

(a) Occlusal and (b) inner surface views of the MPS in the veneer presenting the highest MPS; (c) top and (d) inner (cementation) surfaces of the core views. The system configuration presented the core with no proximal axial wall height reduction, in the presence of horizontal loading components, core thickness of 1 mm, cement thickness of 0.2 mm, 40 GPa cement modulus, and an alumina core (legend units in MPa).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

(a) Occlusal and (b) inner surface views of the MPS distribution in the veneer layer crown presenting the lowest MPS; (c) top and (d) inner (cementation) surfaces of the core views. The system configuration here had a 1.5 mm axial wall height reduction, no horizontal loading, core thickness of 1 mm, cement thickness of 0.2 mm, 40 GPa cement modulus, and a zirconia core (legend units in MPa).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Exploded view of the tooth preparation (TP), cement layer (CL), crown core (CC), and crown veneer (CV)

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