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Research Papers

A Study on Construction Three-Dimensional Nonlinear Finite Element Model and Stress Distribution Analysis of Anterior Cruciate Ligament

[+] Author and Article Information
Feng Xie, Lin Guo, Gang Dai

Center of Joint Surgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038, China

Liu Yang1

Center of Joint Surgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038, Chinajointsurgery@163.com

Zhi-jun Wang

College of Civil Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400045, China

1

Corresponding author.

J Biomech Eng 131(12), 121007 (Nov 10, 2009) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000167 History: Received May 08, 2009; Revised June 10, 2009; Posted September 04, 2009; Published November 10, 2009; Online November 10, 2009

To establish a finite element model that reflects the geometric characteristics of the normal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), explore the approaches to model knee joint ligaments and analyze the mechanics of the model. A healthy knee joint specimen was subjected to three-dimensional laser scanning, and then a three-dimensional finite element model for the normal ACL was established using three-dimensional finite element software. Based on the model, the loads of the ACL were simulated to analyze the stress-strain relationship and stress distribution of the ACL. Using the ABAQUS software, a three-dimensional finite element model was established. The whole model contained 22,125 nodes and 46,411 units. In terms of geometric similarity and mesh precision, this model was superior to previous finite element models for the ACL. Through the introduction of material properties, boundary conditions, and loads, finite elements were analyzed and computed successfully. The relationship between overall nodal forces and the displacement of the ACL under anterior loads of the tibia was determined. In addition, the nephogram of the ACL stress spatial distribution was obtained. A vivid, three-dimensional model of the knee joint was established rapidly by using reverse engineering technology and laser scanning. The three-dimensional finite element method can be used for the ACL biomechanics research. The method accurately simulated the ACL stress distribution with the tibia under anterior loads, and the computational results were of clinical significance.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Three-dimensional finite element model that involves the distal segment of femur, ACL, and the proximal segment of tibia

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Figure 2

ACL stress spatial distribution at 2 mm anterior displacement of the tibia

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Figure 3

ACL stress spatial distribution at 4 mm anterior displacement of the tibia

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Figure 4

ACL stress spatial distribution at 6 mm anterior displacement of the tibia

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Figure 5

ACL stress spatial distribution at 8 mm anterior displacement of the tibia

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Figure 6

ACL stress spatial distribution at 10 mm anterior displacement of the tibia

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Figure 7

Comparison of finite element simulation curve and experimental curve reflecting the relationship between overall nodal forces and the anterior displacement of the tibia

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