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Technical Briefs

Effect of Frozen Storage on Dynamic Tensile Properties of Human Placenta

[+] Author and Article Information
Kathleen D. Klinich

Transportation Research Institute,  University of Michigan, 2901 Baxter Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48109kklinich@umich.edu

Carl S. Miller

Transportation Research Institute,  University of Michigan, 2901 Baxter Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48109carlmill@umich.edu

Jingwen Hu

Transportation Research Institute,  University of Michigan, 2901 Baxter Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48109jwhu@umich.edu

Giseli M. Nazmi

 University of Michigan Hospital and Health Centers 1500 E. Med Center Drive, L4000 Women’s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0276giseli.moreno@gmail.com

Mark D. Pearlman

 University of Michigan Hospital and Health Centers; S Jan Behrman Professor and Service Chief,Department of Ob/Gyn, 1500 E. Med Center Drive, L4000 Women’s Hospital,Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0276pearlman@med.umich.edu

Lawrence W. Schneider

Transportation Research Institute,  University of Michigan; Research Professor of Biomedical Engineering,College of Engineering, 2901 Baxter Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48109lws@umich.edu

Jonathan D. Rupp

Transportation Research Institute,  University of Michigan; Research Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine,  University of Michigan Medical School; Research Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering,  University of Michigan College of Engineering, 2901 Baxter Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48109jrupp@umich.edu

J Biomech Eng 134(3), 034501 (Mar 19, 2012) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006025 History: Received December 14, 2011; Revised January 09, 2012; Accepted January 11, 2012; Posted February 13, 2012; Published March 16, 2012; Online March 19, 2012

Dynamic mechanical properties of placenta tissue are needed to develop computational models of pregnant occupants for use in designing restraint systems that protect the fetus and mother. Tests were performed on 21 samples obtained from five human placentas at a rate of 1200 %/s using a set of custom designed thermoelectrically cooled clamps. Approximately half of the samples from all five subjects were tested within 48 h of delivery. The remaining samples were frozen for 5–7 days and then thawed before testing. True failure stresses and strains were not significantly different between fresh and frozen samples (p-value = 0.858 and 0.551, respectively), suggesting that soft tissue may be stored frozen up to a week without adversely affecting dynamic material response.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Preparation of placenta for uniaxial tissue testing. Sections of the placenta measuring 10 cm × 2.5 cm are identified for testing (left) and sectioned into separate tissue samples using a sharp knife (right).

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Figure 2

Illustration of UMTRI designed thermoelectrically cooled cryoclamp

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Figure 3

Oblique view of test specimen mounted in test fixture. Spring loaded adaptor above the upper grip was used to allow the actuator to reach the desired velocity before the tissue sample was loaded.

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Figure 4

3D FARO scan data (left) and resulting surface geometry (right)

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Figure 5

Silicone heaters used to heat tissue sample in the active region. Heaters were not allowed to touch the tissue sample.

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Figure 6

High-speed images of the front (left), side (center), and rear (right) of a test specimen at the time of tissue failure

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