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Research Papers

Deterioration of Bone Quality in the Tibia and Fibula in Growing Mice During Skeletal Unloading: Gender-Related Differences

[+] Author and Article Information
Chang-Yong Ko

 Inspection and Diagnosis Methods, Fraunhofer Institute for Nondestructive Testing, Dresden 01109, Germany

Dong Hyun Seo

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Institute of Medical Engineering and Yonsei-Fraunhofer Medical Device Lab,  Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon 220-710, Republic of Korea

Han Sung Kim1

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Institute of Medical Engineering and Yonsei-Fraunhofer Medical Device Lab,  Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon 220-710, Republic of Koreahanskim@yonsei.ac.kr

1

Corresponding author.

J Biomech Eng 133(11), 111003 (Nov 28, 2011) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005350 History: Received March 24, 2011; Revised October 21, 2011; Posted October 24, 2011; Published November 28, 2011; Online November 28, 2011

Skeletal unloading causes bone loss in both men and women; however, only a few studies have been performed on the effects of gender differences on bone quality during skeletal unloading. Moreover, although the fibula also plays an important role in load bearing and ankle stability, the effects of unloading on the fibula have been rarely investigated. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of skeletal unloading on bone quality of the tibia and fibula in growing animals and to determine whether differences existed between genders. Six-week-old female and male mice were randomly allocated into two groups. The right hindlimb of each mouse in the skeletal unloading group was subjected to sciatic neurectomy. After two weeks of skeletal unloading, the structural characteristics of the tibia and fibula in both genders were worsened. In addition, the bone mineralization density distribution (MDD) of the tibia and fibula in both genders were altered. However, the magnitude of deterioration and alteration of the MDD in the bones of females were larger than in those of males. These results demonstrate that skeletal unloading diminishes bone quality in the tibia and fibula, leading to an increase in bone fracture risks, particularly in females.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Bone
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Figures

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Figure 1

References of volume of interest (VOI) and region of interest (ROI) for analyses of structural parameters in trabecular bone and cortical bone of both tibia and fibula: (a) VOI, (b) ROI for trabecular bone, and (c) ROI for cortical bone

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Figure 2

Relative changes in structural parameters: (a) trabecular bone of the tibia, (b) cortical bone of the tibia, and the fibula. Means ± standard error of mean; black bar (sham), gray bar (unloading); † versus sham, p < 0.05; ♂ versus male in each loading condition, p < 0.05.

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Figure 3

Differences or changes in trabecular bone structure: (a) male, and (b) female

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Figure 4

Alterations in the MMI for cortical bone of the tibia and fibula from proximal to distal locations: (a) the tibia, and (b) the fibula

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Figure 5

Alterations in the MDD: (a) trabecular bone of the tibia in male, (b) trabecular bone of the tibia in female; (c) cortical bone of the tibia in male, (d) cortical bone of the tibia in female, (e) cortical bone of the fibula in male, (f): cortical bone of the fibula in female. Left column, male; right column, female.

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