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Research Papers

MRI-Based Modeling for Radiocarpal Joint Mechanics: Validation Criteria and Results for Four Specimen-Specific Models

[+] Author and Article Information
Kenneth J. Fischer1

 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kansas, 1530 W 15th Street, Room 3138,Lawrence, KS 66045-7609fischer@ku.edu Midwest Research Institute, 425 Volker Boulevard,Kansas City, MO 64110e-mail: awaller@mriresearch.orgfischer@ku.edu Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., Mail Stop 3017, Kansas City, KS 66160-7387fischer@ku.edu Biomedical Imaging Department,Faculty of Medicine,University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, 50603 Malaysia e-mail: mbilgen@um.edu.myfischer@ku.edu

Joshua E. Johnson

 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kansas, 1530 W 15th Street, Room 3138,Lawrence, KS 66045-7609a2joe@ku.edu Midwest Research Institute, 425 Volker Boulevard,Kansas City, MO 64110e-mail: awaller@mriresearch.orga2joe@ku.edu Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., Mail Stop 3017, Kansas City, KS 66160-7387a2joe@ku.edu Biomedical Imaging Department,Faculty of Medicine,University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, 50603 Malaysia e-mail: mbilgen@um.edu.mya2joe@ku.edu

Alexander J. Waller, Mehmet Bilgen

 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kansas, 1530 W 15th Street, Room 3138,Lawrence, KS 66045-7609 Midwest Research Institute, 425 Volker Boulevard,Kansas City, MO 64110e-mail: awaller@mriresearch.org Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., Mail Stop 3017, Kansas City, KS 66160-7387 Biomedical Imaging Department,Faculty of Medicine,University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, 50603 Malaysia e-mail: mbilgen@um.edu.my

Terence E. McIff

 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kansas, 1530 W 15th Street, Room 3138,Lawrence, KS 66045-7609tmciff@kumc.edu Midwest Research Institute, 425 Volker Boulevard,Kansas City, MO 64110e-mail: awaller@mriresearch.orgtmciff@kumc.edu Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., Mail Stop 3017, Kansas City, KS 66160-7387tmciff@kumc.edu Biomedical Imaging Department,Faculty of Medicine,University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, 50603 Malaysia e-mail: mbilgen@um.edu.mytmciff@kumc.edu

E. Bruce Toby

 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kansas, 1530 W 15th Street, Room 3138,Lawrence, KS 66045-7609btoby@kumc.edu Midwest Research Institute, 425 Volker Boulevard,Kansas City, MO 64110e-mail: awaller@mriresearch.orgbtoby@kumc.edu Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., Mail Stop 3017, Kansas City, KS 66160-7387btoby@kumc.edu Biomedical Imaging Department,Faculty of Medicine,University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, 50603 Malaysia e-mail: mbilgen@um.edu.mybtoby@kumc.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J Biomech Eng 133(10), 101004 (Oct 31, 2011) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005171 History: Received March 04, 2011; Revised September 20, 2011; Published October 31, 2011; Online October 31, 2011

The objective of this study was to validate the MRI-based joint contact modeling methodology in the radiocarpal joints by comparison of model results with invasive specimen-specific radiocarpal contact measurements from four cadaver experiments. We used a single validation criterion for multiple outcome measures to characterize the utility and overall validity of the modeling approach. For each experiment, a Pressurex film and a Tekscan sensor were sequentially placed into the radiocarpal joints during simulated grasp. Computer models were constructed based on MRI visualization of the cadaver specimens without load. Images were also acquired during the loaded configuration used with the direct experimental measurements. Geometric surface models of the radius, scaphoid and lunate (including cartilage) were constructed from the images acquired without the load. The carpal bone motions from the unloaded state to the loaded state were determined using a series of 3D image registrations. Cartilage thickness was assumed uniform at 1.0 mm with an effective compressive modulus of 4 MPa. Validation was based on experimental versus model contact area, contact force, average contact pressure and peak contact pressure for the radioscaphoid and radiolunate articulations. Contact area was also measured directly from images acquired under load and compared to the experimental and model data. Qualitatively, there was good correspondence between the MRI-based model data and experimental data, with consistent relative size, shape and location of radioscaphoid and radiolunate contact regions. Quantitative data from the model generally compared well with the experimental data for all specimens. Contact area from the MRI-based model was very similar to the contact area measured directly from the images. For all outcome measures except average and peak pressures, at least two specimen models met the validation criteria with respect to experimental measurements for both articulations. Only the model for one specimen met the validation criteria for average and peak pressure of both articulations; however the experimental measures for peak pressure also exhibited high variability. MRI-based modeling can reliably be used for evaluating the contact area and contact force with similar confidence as in currently available experimental techniques. Average contact pressure, and peak contact pressure were more variable from all measurement techniques, and these measures from MRI-based modeling should be used with some caution.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Isolation and suturing of the tendons and fixation of radius and ulna to PVC plate. The radius has two plastic bolts and ulna has one. The isolated and sutured extensor carpi radialis tendons are clearly seen at the bottom of the image.

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Figure 2

Illustration of the bone isolation process prior to image registration. The isolated radius bone (right) was derived from the initial MR image (left), as would also be the case for the scaphoid and lunate.

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Figure 3

Example comparison of pressure distribution from Pressurex film (a), (d), the Tekscan pressure sensor (b), (e), and the MRI-based models (c), (f) for Specimens 3 (a), (b), (c) and 4 (d), (e), (f). All images are oriented with dorsal at top, lunate fossa to the right, and scaphoid fossa to the left. Note the consistent dorsal contact measured by the Tekscan sensor and the MRI-based models.

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Figure 4

The sum of radiolunate and radioscaphoid joint contact forces across the wrist by specimen (S1–S4) for Pressurex film (Film), the Tekscan pressure sensor (Tek), and the MRI-based contact models (Model). The asterisks and braces indicate which model measurements met the validation criterion for total joint force and with respect to which experimental measures.

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Figure 5

Contact area for all measurement methods compared by specimen (S1–S4), and by articulation (RS = radioscaphoid, RL = radiolunate). Model data matches the direct measurements well in all cases, and the Tekscan contact area is also consistently similar (except for S1).

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